The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books This week: Meg Wolitzer's latest, Charles Frazier returns to the Civil War, the pressures of being the only black person in the room, a new Macbeth, and marriage-saving tips from a divorce lawyer.

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., (center) attends a luncheon with other GOP senators and President Trump on July 19 at the White House. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Sen. Jeff Flake: 'As Conservatives, Our First Obligation Is To Be Honest'

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An 1894 engraving depicts chapter 18 of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. De Agostini Picture Library/Getty Images hide caption

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De Agostini Picture Library/Getty Images

The Enduring Legacy Of Jane Austen's 'Truth Universally Acknowledged'

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A Veteran TV News Anchor Pens A Prescient Novel In 'Amanda Wakes Up'

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Yes, Some Comics Are For Kids — And They're Big Business

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A vintage postcard from the Peach Tree State. Georgia isn't the biggest producer of the pink-orange fruit. So why are its peaches so iconic? The answer has a lot to do with slavery — its end and a need for the South to rebrand itself. Found Image Holdings Inc/Getty Images hide caption

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Found Image Holdings Inc/Getty Images

Bao Phi hopes his poetry book Thousand Star Hotel and his children's book A Different Pond can fill the hole in Asian-American literature that he saw when he was a kid. Anna Min/Courtesy of Capstone Publishing hide caption

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Anna Min/Courtesy of Capstone Publishing

The Poet Bao Phi, On Creating A 'Guidebook' For Young Asian-Americans

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Thoreau was born 200 years ago, on July 12, 1817. He died of tuberculosis at age 44. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

If Thoreau Were Alive, He'd Be 'Shouting From The Rafters,' Biographer Says

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We've searched shelves, shops and sites across the universe to bring you some really great comics. Shannon Wright for NPR hide caption

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Shannon Wright for NPR

Eloise's dog, Weenie, wasn't always a pug, as evidenced by this 1954 Hilary Knight drawing. Collection of Hilary Knight/Copyright Kay Thompson/ New York Historical Society hide caption

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Collection of Hilary Knight/Copyright Kay Thompson/ New York Historical Society

'Eloise At The Museum' Tells The Story Behind The Beloved Mischief-Maker

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"I lost the first good novel I ever wrote to a computer disaster. It happened at a crucial time in my life, when I was still figuring out if I could even do this thing — become a writer." Katie Edwards/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Katie Edwards/Getty Images/Ikon Images

A Novelist Forces Himself To Press On After Losing 100 Pages In A Tech Glitch

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Octavia Butler at home. A lifelong bibliophile, she considered libraries sacred spaces. (c) Patti Perret/The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens hide caption

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(c) Patti Perret/The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

Octavia Butler: Writing Herself Into The Story

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Author Elin Hilderbrand fell in love with summer as a kid, at the cottage her family rented on Cape Cod. Nina Subin hide caption

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Nina Subin

Writer Elin Hilderbrand, 'Queen Of Summer,' Wears Her Crown Proudly

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