The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books This week: Meg Wolitzer's latest, Charles Frazier returns to the Civil War, the pressures of being the only black person in the room, a new Macbeth, and marriage-saving tips from a divorce lawyer.
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The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books

This week: Meg Wolitzer, Charles Frazier, Jo Nesbo, Nafissa Thompson-Spires and James Sexton.
Jun Tsuboike/NPR

Now Is Not The Time For Realistic Fiction, Says Margaret Atwood

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Former New York Times restaurant critic and Gourmet editor Ruth Reichl speaks in New York City in 2013. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for The New York Times hide caption

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Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for The New York Times

How Twitter And Cooking Saved Ruth Reichl After 'Gourmet' Folded

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From left: Sodium benzoate, azodicarbonamide, shellac. The images are from Ingredients: A Visual Exploration of 75 Additives & 25 Food Products. Dwight Eschliman/Regan Arts hide caption

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Dwight Eschliman/Regan Arts

In Kevin Henkes' new picture book, all of the figurines on the windowsill are waiting for something. "It's really about the concept of waiting," he says. HarperCollins Children's Books hide caption

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HarperCollins Children's Books

Some Kids' Books Are Worth The Wait: 'They Do Take Time,' Says Kevin Henkes

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Cover crop Courtesy of Graywolf Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Graywolf Press

For Prolific Author Percival Everett, The Wilderness Is A Place Of Clarity

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Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Finding Love And Self-Acceptance 'Under the Udala Trees'

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A survey from the Authors Guild reveals a 30 percent decline in author income since 2009. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

When It Comes To Book Sales, What Counts As Success Might Surprise You

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Author Mary Karr says she once broke her computer's delete key while writing a memoir. Deborah Feingold/HarperCollins hide caption

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Deborah Feingold/HarperCollins

Mary Karr On Writing Memoirs: 'No Doubt I've Gotten A Million Things Wrong'

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Emily Bogle/NPR

Join The 'Morning Edition' Book Club As We Read 'Fates And Furies'

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"Poetry is a call to action," says poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera, "and it also is action." Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Poet Laureate's Migrant Childhood Was Like 'Living In Literature Every Day'

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Joyce Carol Oates, pictured above on Easter, 1949. It is strange, she says, to live so long that you are older than your own parents were when they died. She uses the word "vertiginous" to describe the dizzying sensation of looking back on your life from a distance you can't believe you've traveled. Courtesy of Random House hide caption

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Courtesy of Random House

Joyce Carol Oates' Memoir Revisits The Farm And The Family That Shaped Her

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An Afghan Writer Wants To Return Home, But It Could Cost Him His Life

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