The 20th Anniversary Of The 9/11 Attacks The world remembers the victims and reflects on the changes that have taken place in the decades since Sept. 11, 2001.
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The 20th Anniversary Of The 9/11 Attacks

Danielle Booker hugs her mother, Sharon Booker, as the two remember Sean Booker, Danielle's father and Sharon's husband, at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum during a ceremony on Saturday in Manhattan. Sean Booker was a technician on the 93rd floor of the World Trade Center's north tower when he was killed during the 2001 attacks. RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/Denver Post via Getty Images

Members of the Berlin city fire department attend a ceremony Saturday near the Breitscheidplatz memorial to commemorate fellow firefighters and other victims killed in the 9/11 terror attacks in New York City. Omer Messinger/Getty Images hide caption

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Omer Messinger/Getty Images

Family members and loved ones of victims of those who died on 9/11 attend the 20th anniversary commemoration ceremony on Saturday at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York City. Chip Somodevilla/Pool/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Ali Malik is part of a class action lawsuit against the FBI alleging religious discrimination and violations of surveillance laws. Umara Chaudry hide caption

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Umara Chaudry

For Many American Muslims, The Legacy Of 9/11 Lies In The Battle For Civil Rights

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In the years after the 9/11 terror attacks, security became omnipresent in Washington, D.C. That includes bollards, Jersey barriers and security barricades like those seen here outside of the U.S. Capitol. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

After 9/11 Security Became Omnipresent In Washington, But Threats Are Different Now

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Recovery workers head to ground zero in New York City after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. Langevin Jacques/Sygma via Getty Images hide caption

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Langevin Jacques/Sygma via Getty Images

Opinion: United We Stood As 9/11 Responders Toiled And Families Searched

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President George W. Bush stands in the rubble of the World Trade Center in New York and speaks to workers involved in the cleanup effort on Sept. 14, 2001. Doug Mills/AP hide caption

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Doug Mills/AP

Two Decades After 9/11, Are We Safer?

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Teresa Garcia says she remains haunted by the dozens of undocumented workers she believes remain missing at the site of 9/11. Jasmine Garsd/NPR/Jasmine Garsd/NPR hide caption

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Jasmine Garsd/NPR/Jasmine Garsd/NPR

Families Of Undocumented Immigrants Lost On 9/11 Continue To Search For Closure

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President Joe Biden speaks about his strategy to combat the coronavirus pandemic at Brookland Middle School on Friday in Washington, D.C. Later in the day, he issued a video commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Two men identified by authorities as hijackers Mohamed Atta (right) and Abdulaziz Alomari (center) pass through airport security on Sept. 11, 2001, at Portland International Jetport in Maine in an image from airport surveillance tape released on Sept. 19, 2001. Reuters/Portland Police Department hide caption

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Reuters/Portland Police Department

A child reaches out to touch a flower adorning the Sept. 11 memorial on the name of a veteran killed in the 2001 terror attacks. For today's generation of kids, 9/11 is a history lesson. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

How To Talk About 9/11 With A New Generation Of Kids

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Jack Grandcolas, who lost his pregnant wife on United Flight 93, sits near his home in Pebble Beach, Calif. Twenty years after Sept. 11, he is still working through his loss. Haven Daley/AP hide caption

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Haven Daley/AP

How Mourning Has Been Different For Each Of These 9/11 Families

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A visitor touches a victim's name inscribed on a bronze parapet at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York City in 2020. Wang Ying/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Ying/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

For Many Who Were Present, The 9/11 Attacks Have Had A Lasting Mental Health Impact

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Richard and Lori Guadagno around 2001. Tim Lambert hide caption

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Tim Lambert

Her Brother Died On Flight 93. She Still Sees Him Surfacing In Small Ways

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Twenty years after 9/11, the first responders who rushed in to save lives at the World Trade Center suffer higher rates of cancer than the general public. And many have died of cancers linked to the exposure to toxins in the air. But research suggests they're surviving at higher rates too. Gary Hershorn/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Hershorn/Getty Images

9/11 First Responders Face A High Cancer Risk But Are Also More Likely To Survive

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An Nguyen sits for a portrait at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va. Nguyen had just turned four when his father died in the 9/11 attack on the Pentagon. Ian Morton/NPR hide caption

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Ian Morton/NPR

They Don't Remember Their Parents Dying On 9/11. But They'll Never Forget

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Visitors walk through the Flight 93 National Memorial in southwestern Pennsylvania. The memorial is dedicated to the people who died on United Airlines Flight 93 on Sept. 11, 2001. Tim Lambert hide caption

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Tim Lambert

Part Of Flight 93 Crashed On My Land. I Went Back To The Sacred Ground 20 Years Later

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