Hispanic Heritage Month National Hispanic Heritage Month in the U.S. runs from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15. NPR celebrates these communities — with stories, podcasts and El Tiny, a takeover of NPR Music's Tiny Desk Concerts.
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Isabel Allende's (right) newest memoir is The Soul of a Woman, and Sandra Cisneros' (left) latest book is a bilingual tale of ex-pat Latinas in Paris, Martita, I Remember You/Martita, te recuerdo. Leonardo Cendamo/Getty Images / NPR Illustration hide caption

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Leonardo Cendamo/Getty Images / NPR Illustration

It's Lit! Latina Novelists On Living With (And Writing In) Two Languages

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Silvana Estrada, pictured at the 2020 Spotify Awards in Mexico City, is among the artists featured in NPR's "El Tiny" concert series for Hispanic Heritage Month. Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for Spotify hide caption

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Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for Spotify

Alt Latino's Latest Tiny Desk Takeover Features Female Performers

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Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, seen in February, U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, has made the inclusion of Latinos in media a principal issue. A government report says the absence of Latinos in the media could impact how their fellow Americans view them. AP hide caption

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AP

Different types of potatoes seed are seen displayed in "Parque de la Papa" or Potato Park, in Pisac, Peru. One hundred and fifty type of tubers from the Sacred Valley highlands are native to Peru. Martin Mejia/AP hide caption

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Martin Mejia/AP

As the nation begins its annual celebration of Latino history, culture and other achievements, it's not too late to ask why we lump together roughly 62 million people with complex identities under a single umbrella. Peter Pencil/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Pencil/Getty Images

The chile en nogada — a stuffed poblano pepper covered in a walnut sauce — has become a classic Mexican dish. The version plated here comes from Ricardo Muñoz Zurita's Azul Condesa restaurant in Mexico City. Omar Torres/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Torres/AFP via Getty Images

For 200 Years, Chiles En Nogada Has Been An Iconic, And Patriotic, Mexican Meal

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This year's Broadway-adapted movie In the Heights, starring actor Anthony Ramos — pictured alongside actress Jasmine Cephas Jones — is a rare exception to Hollywood's pattern of excluding Latino narratives. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

People hold Cuban, Venezuelan and Nicaraguan flags during a protest showing support for Cubans demonstrating against their government in Miami on July 18. The US. Latino population has grown significantly in the last decade. Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

Citlaly Olvera Salazar dances with an image of her grandfather, Antonio Salazar, and father, Cesar Olvera, in their absence during her Quinceañera. Maridelis Morales Rosado for NPR hide caption

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Maridelis Morales Rosado for NPR

COVID-19 Delayed Quinceañera Celebrations. And Now, 17 Is The New 15

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Singer and actor Leslie Grace stars as Nina Rosario (center), the beloved and brilliant neighborhood sweetheart in the film adaptation of the musical In the Heights. Macall Polay/Warner Brothers hide caption

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Macall Polay/Warner Brothers

Edith Arangoitia receives a COVID-19 vaccination in Chelsea, Mass., a heavily Hispanic community, on Feb. 16. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Misinformation And Mistrust Among The Obstacles Latinos Face In Getting Vaccinated

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A COVID-19 test is collected in Salt Lake City, Utah. A federal study published Monday found that Hispanic and non-white workers make up a disproportionate share of COVID-19 cases associated with workplace outbreaks in Utah. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Millions of jobs have evaporated, particularly from businesses that employ a large number of Hispanics — like hotels, restaurants, bars, building services. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images