International Desk Stories published by the NPR International News Team.

International Desk

Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orbán gives a press conference following a meeting of prime ministers of central Europe's informal body of cooperation, called the Visegrad Group (V4) in Budapest, Hungary, last month. Attila Kisbenedek/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Attila Kisbenedek/AFP via Getty Images

A discomfort with Western liberalism is growing in Eastern Europe

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Students from the Youth Winter Olympic Sports School perform ice and snow gymnastics during an event marking the 100-day countdown to the 2022 Winter Olympic Games in Zhangjiakou, Hebei province, China, on Tuesday. Chen Xiaodong/Costfoto/Barcroft Media/Getty Images hide caption

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Chen Xiaodong/Costfoto/Barcroft Media/Getty Images

Saudi Arabia and China are accused of using sports to cover up human rights abuse

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte and his daughter Sara Duterte arrive for the opening of the Boao Forum for Asia Annual Conference 2018. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Clan politics reign but a family is divided in the race to rule the Philippines

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Head of the International Atomic Energy Agency Rafael Mariano Grossi, left, and Iranian Foreign Minister Hossein Amirabdollahian pictured meeting in Tehran, on Tuesday. Grossi pressed for greater access in the Islamic Republic ahead of diplomatic talks restarting over Tehran's tattered nuclear deal with world powers. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

Supporters of All India Kisan Sangharsh Coordination Committee, a group of farmers' organizations, hold flags during a protest to mark one year since the introduction of divisive farm laws and to demand the withdrawal of the Electricity Amendment Bill, in Hyderabad, India, on Thursday. Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images

An old mental hospital sits in Trieste's San Giovanni Park. The facility closed over 40 years ago, but its ocher pavilions are filled with activity. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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Sylvia Poggioli/NPR

A public mental health model in Italy earns global praise. Now it faces its demise

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Migrants from Haiti get caught on a crevasse along the Acandiseco river, Colombia. Carlos Villalón for NPR hide caption

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Carlos Villalón for NPR

A once-remote patch of rainforest is now packed with migrants trying to reach the U.S.

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Matthias Schmale, serving as director of operations in Gaza for UNRWA, speaks during a news conference in front of the agency's headquarters in Gaza City, in May. Adel Hana/AP hide caption

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Adel Hana/AP

A man holding a child wipes his eye as the Kurdish family from Dohuk in Iraq waits for the border guard patrol, near Narewka, Poland, near the Polish-Belarusian border on Nov. 9. The three-generation family of 16 — with seven minors, including the youngest who is 5 months old — spent about 20 days in the forest and was pushed back to Belarus eight times. Wojtek Radwanski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wojtek Radwanski/AFP via Getty Images

Shipping containers sit stacked at a port in Bayonne, N.J., on Oct. 15. Supply chain problems are disrupting the global economy, causing delays and a shortage of containers. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The pandemic economy's latest victim? The lowly shipping container

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West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee speaks during a by-election campaign in Kolkata on Sept. 26. Famous for her fiery speeches and welfare programs geared toward women, Banerjee, 66, is beloved in her home state. This year, Time magazine included her in its list of the world's 100 most influential people. Debajyoti Chakraborty/NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Debajyoti Chakraborty/NurPhoto/Getty Images

Meet the feisty, 5-foot-tall thorn in the side of India's prime minister

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Teafua Tanu is an islet of Tokelau used by residents of Fakaofo atoll as a Catholic cemetery. Over the past two decades, the territory of Tokelau has proved extremely vulnerable to climate change and rising sea levels owing, partly, to its being a small land mass surrounded by ocean, and its location in a region prone to natural disasters. Vlad Sokhin hide caption

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Vlad Sokhin

Youth climate activists protest on Thursday that representatives of the fossil fuel industry have been allowed inside the venue during the COP26 U.N. Climate Summit in Glasgow. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

The fossil fuel industry turned out in force at COP26. So did climate activists

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A logo adorns a wall on a branch of the Israeli NSO Group company, near the southern Israeli town of Sapir. The cellphones of six Palestinian human rights activists were infected with spyware from the notorious Israeli hacker-for-hire company as early as July 2020. It was the first time the military-grade Pegasus spyware was known to have been used against Palestinian civil society activists. Sebastian Scheiner/AP hide caption

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Sebastian Scheiner/AP

As water levels dropped in the marshlands this summer, the marsh water became too salty for the water buffalo to drink. Mootaz Sami for NPR hide caption

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Mootaz Sami for NPR

In Iraq's famed marshlands, climate change is upending a way of life

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Nicaragua's President Daniel Ortega and his wife, Vice President Rosario Murillo, lead a rally in the capital Managua in 2018. Alfredo Zuniga/AP hide caption

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Alfredo Zuniga/AP

South Korean cast members (from left) Park Hae-soo, Lee Jung-jae and Jung Ho-yeon in a scene from Squid Game. The series is a globally popular South Korea-produced Netflix show that depicts hundreds of financially distressed characters competing in deadly children's games for a chance to escape severe debt. Youngkyu Park/AP hide caption

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Youngkyu Park/AP

For cash-strapped South Koreans, the class conflict in 'Squid Game' is deadly serious

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British Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks during a news conference at the U.N. Climate Change Conference COP26 in Glasgow, Scotland, on Tuesday. Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images

The U.K. considers its 1st new coal mine in decades even as it calls to phase out coal

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A bulldozer loads coal onto railway wagons at the Jharia coalfield in Dhanbad in India's Jharkhand state. Gautam Dey/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Gautam Dey/AFP via Getty Images

In the German language, nouns themselves are often gendered. Cities across Germany, including Lubeck, are now trying to use gender-neutral language by placing a colon or asterisk within words. Marcus Brandt/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Brandt/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images

Germany debates how to form gender-neutral words out of its gendered language

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President Biden participates in a CNN town hall at the Baltimore Center Stage Pearlstone Theater, on Oct. 21. When asked whether the U.S. would protect Taiwan if China attacked, he said the U.S. has a "commitment" to do so. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP