Native American Heritage Month National Native American Heritage Month takes place for the month of November. NPR celebrates Indigenous communities, — with stories, podcasts and more.

Native American Heritage Month

A child-size Minnetonka suede and leather moccasin, pictured in 2011. The company has apologized for appropriating Native American culture and promised to do more to support Indigenous communities. Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Four activists speak during a panel discussion hosted by the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian on Indigenous Peoples' Day. Clockwise, from top left: Amber Starks, Joy SpearChief-Morris, Autumn Rose Williams and Kyle T. Mays. Screenshot by NPR/Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR/Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Protesters marched in an Indigenous Peoples Day rally in Boston on Oct. 10, 2020, as part of a demonstration to change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples' Day. Boston made that change last week. Erin Clark/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Clark/Boston Globe via Getty Images

A memorial to missing and murdered Indigenous women is set up in St. Paul, Minn. Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Media Fascination With The Petito Mystery Looks Like Racism To Some Native Americans

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Joy Harjo's memoir is Poet Warrior. She plays saxophone and recites poetry on her new album, I Pray for My Enemies. Shawn Miller/W.W. Norton hide caption

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Shawn Miller/W.W. Norton

'Poet Warrior' Joy Harjo Wants Native Peoples To Be Seen As Human

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This cemetery on the grounds of Carlisle Barracks holds the remains of students from the former Carlisle Indian Industrial School. Scott Finger/U.S. Army War College Photo Lab hide caption

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Scott Finger/U.S. Army War College Photo Lab

Indian Boarding Schools' Traumatic Legacy, And The Fight To Get Native Ancestors Back

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Born and raised on the Cheyenne River Reservation, a sovereign Lakota nation in South Dakota, Dawnee LeBeau is Oóhenuŋpa Itázipčo (two kettle and without bows) of the Tetonwan Oyate (people of the plains). After losing her father, she found comfort in doing things she did with him, like identifying plants. LeBeau was doing that with family when she made this image of her niece. Dawnee LeBeau hide caption

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Dawnee LeBeau

A new version of the Oregon Trail game for Apple Arcade features improved Native American representation and new playable Native American characters and storylines. Gameloft hide caption

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Gameloft

A New Spin On A Classic Video Game Gives Native Americans Better Representation

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Goode looks on as sourberry bushes burn. After the bushes are burned in the winter, they sprout again in the spring. Lauren Sommer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/NPR

To Manage Wildfire, California Looks To What Tribes Have Known All Along

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