The COP26 summit A climate extravaganza will get underway in Glasgow, Scotland. It's billed as a potential turning point in the struggle to avert the worst effects of climate change.
Special Series

The COP26 summit

Last minute resistance at the COP26 summit over efforts to phase out coal left many countries disappointed, but the agreement still marked new progress. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Climate activists demonstrate at the COP26 U.N. Climate Summit in Glasgow, Scotland, Friday. Negotiators from almost 200 nations were making a fresh push to reach agreement on a series of key issues. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alastair Grant/AP

Teafua Tanu is an islet of Tokelau used by residents of Fakaofo atoll as a Catholic cemetery. Over the past two decades, the territory of Tokelau has proved extremely vulnerable to climate change and rising sea levels owing, partly, to its being a small land mass surrounded by ocean, and its location in a region prone to natural disasters. Vlad Sokhin hide caption

toggle caption
Vlad Sokhin

Youth climate activists protest on Thursday that representatives of the fossil fuel industry have been allowed inside the venue during the COP26 U.N. Climate Summit in Glasgow. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alastair Grant/AP

The fossil fuel industry turned out in force at COP26. So did climate activists

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1055030272/1055030273" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Delegates attend the COP26 UN Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, Scotland Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images

These researchers are trying to stop misinformation from derailing climate progress

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1054850363/1055030291" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In 2017, Hurricane Maria damaged 90% of the housing stock on the Caribbean island of Dominica. The country was still recovering from two extreme storms over the previous two years. AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. climate envoy John Kerry speaks at the COP26 summit during a joint U.S.-China statement on a declaration enhancing climate action. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images

U.S. and China announce surprise climate agreement at COP26 summit

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1054648598/1054884215" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Activists dressed as debt collectors hold cutouts of the leaders of the United States, Canada, Australia, the UK and Italy in front of the International Monetary Fund headquarters in Washington, D.C., last month to ask rich nations to keep their financial commitment to developing countries to tackle climate change. Pedro Ugarte/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pedro Ugarte/AFP via Getty Images

Brianna Fruean, a Samoan member of the Pacific Climate Warriors, speaks at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland, on Tuesday. Ian Forsyth/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ian Forsyth/Getty Images

For Brianna Fruean, the smell of mud drives home the need for climate action

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1054326427/1054529947" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A stacker-reclaimer next to a stockpile of coal at the Newcastle Coal Terminal in Newcastle, New South Wales. Australia is a major coal producer. A new draft agreement at the climate summit in Scotland calls for ending coal power. Brendon Thorne/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendon Thorne/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Vanessa Nakate speaks during the climate strike march on October 1, 2021 in Milan, Italy. Stefano Guidi/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stefano Guidi/Getty Images

Uganda's Vanessa Nakate says COP26 sidelines nations most affected by climate change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1053943770/1054232501" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Winifred Muisyo, right, and her 5-year-old daughter, Patience Kativa, watch Stanlas Kisilu, left, as he installs a TV tuner on the roof of her home. The TV is connected to a solar panel provided by d.light, a company partially funded by climate financing from wealthier nations. Khadija Farah for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Khadija Farah for NPR

This Kenyan family got solar power. High-level climate talks determine who else will

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1052926511/1054175461" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Machakos, Kenya- Oct 28, 2021. D.Light Territory Sales Executive Stanlas Kisilu installs a solar light outside Winifred Muisyo's home. Khadija Farah for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Khadija Farah for NPR

A wind turbine in front of a steaming coal power plant in Gelsenkirchen, Germany in 2010. New reports find countries' latest promises to cut climate emissions are still not enough to avoid the worst impacts from warming. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Meissner/AP

A kayaker paddles down an interstate in Pennsylvania after flooding from Hurricane Ida earlier this year. Several dozen people died, some in cars and basement apartments, during extreme flash flooding. Branden Eastwood/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Branden Eastwood/AFP via Getty Images

As water levels dropped in the marshlands this summer, the marsh water became too salty for the water buffalo to drink. Mootaz Sami for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Mootaz Sami for NPR

In Iraq's famed marshlands, climate change is upending a way of life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1051468823/1053326495" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A seawall stretches for hundreds of miles along the coast of Guyana, in northern South America. It protects the low-lying coastal lands where the majority of Guyana's population lives. The region is acutely threatened by rising sea levels, as well as other symptoms of climate change, yet Guyana is embracing the oil industry. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Kellman/NPR

Guyana is a poor country that was a green champion. Then Exxon discovered oil

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1051892092/1052774804" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Climate activists march in Sydney during a COP26 protest on Saturday that was one of several demonstrations held around the world. Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images

Smoke rises from a brick kiln on the outskirts of Gauhati, India, in 2015. India's pledge this week to reach net zero carbon emissions by 2070 factors into a new, more optimistic, analysis by the International Energy Agency on climate change goals. Anupam Nath/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Anupam Nath/AP

Thousands of mostly young protesters gathered at a Fridays For Future rally in Glasgow, Scotland, the host city for the COP26 U.N. climate talks. The protest was part of a series of demonstrations being staged around the world Friday and Saturday. Alberto Pezzali/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alberto Pezzali/AP