Stuck in transit: The supply chain in disarray Bottlenecks in every part of the global supply chain — from ships and ports, to trucks and warehouses — has led to huge delays in products arriving at manufacturers and retailers.
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Stuck in transit: The supply chain in disarray

A person walks in an Ikea warehouse in New York City on Oct. 15. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Warehouses are overwhelmed by America's shopping spree

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Americans are shopping more than ever before, but supply is struggling to meet demand

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The supply chain is a mess. Consumers are paying the price

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Shipping containers tower over the truck entrance of the Port Houston Barbours Cut Container Terminal in La Porte, Texas. Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR hide caption

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Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Waiting on that holiday gift from your online cart? It might be stuck at a seaport

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The price of glass jars to hold pasta sauce and other products has soared during the pandemic. Sauce-maker Paul Guglielmo in Rochester, N.Y., has absorbed some of the increase, but he has also raised prices for consumers. Paul Guglielmo hide caption

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Paul Guglielmo

Cargo traffic jams affect glass bottles too. Your pantry staples could cost more

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An employee organizes an aisle at Mary Arnold Toys, New York City's oldest toy store, on Aug. 2. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Santa's sleigh is looking emptier. Fewer toys, higher prices loom for holiday season

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Nicole Wolter at work at her factory in Wauconda, Ill., which makes components for industrial machines. Wolter's company is straining to meet demand as her own suppliers struggle with short staffing. HM Manufacturing hide caption

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HM Manufacturing

How A Single Missing Part Can Hold Up $5 Million Machines And Unleash Industrial Hell

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A farmer holds soybeans from her Nebraska farm in 2019. Today, farmers are struggling to find containers that can ship their products to Asia. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Farmers Have A Big Problem On Their Hands: They Can't Find A Way To Ship Their Stuff

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Shipping containers are stacked high at the Port of Los Angeles in April. Supply chain disruptions are hitting small-business owners across the United States. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Cargo Is Piling Up Everywhere, And It's Making Inflation Worse

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Used cars sit on the sales lot at Frank Bent's Wholesale Motors in El Cerrito, Calif., on March 15. Supply chain snarls and pent-up demand are driving up the prices of a lot of things, including new and used cars. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Inflation Is Surging. The Price Of A Toyota Pickup Truck Helps Explain Why

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