Black History Month 2022 February is Black History Month in the U.S., and this year's theme is Black Health and Wellness. NPR has compiled a list of stories, music performances, podcasts and other content that chronicles the Black American experience.
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Black History Month 2022

Post racist attack in 1921 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. American National Red Cross Photograph Collection. GHI/Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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GHI/Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Why does Black History Month matter?

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People hold up signs and bags of Skittles candy during a rally in support of Trayvon Martin at Freedom Plaza in Washington, on Saturday, March 24, 2012. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Trayvon, ten years later

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Robin D. G. Kelley Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Simon & Schuster

Authors Nikole Hannah-Jones and Renée Watson say it's important to be honest with children about the history of race and slavery in America. Penguin Young Readers hide caption

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Penguin Young Readers

'Born on the Water' gives Black children in America their origin story

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National African American History Museum curator on George Floyd protest photo

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Physicist Desiré Whitmore teaches workshops to help teachers better communicate science. As part of that, Desiré uses optical illusions to explain how social blind spots come into play in the classroom. Boris SV/Getty Images hide caption

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Boris SV/Getty Images

Do You See What I See?

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Tintype of a Civil War soldier, 1861 - 1865 Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift from the Liljenquist Family Collection hide caption

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Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift from the Liljenquist Family Collection

Photo of entertainer Josephine Baker is one to appreciate at the Smithsonian

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People pledge allegiance to America as they receive U.S. citizenship at a naturalization ceremony for immigrants in Los Angeles in 2017. Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images

1 in 10 Black people in the U.S. are migrants. Here's what's driving that shift

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Therrious Davis for NPR

Lawmakers want to ban discomfort in school. But Black history isn't always comfortable

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