Ukraine invasion — explained The roots of Russia's invasion of Ukraine go back decades and run deep. The current conflict is more than one country taking over another; it is — in the words of one U.S. official — a shift in "the world order."
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Ukraine invasion — explained

Estonia flags on the shoreline of the Baltic Sea view in Tallinn, Estonia, on Thursday, Feb. 1, 2024. Peter Kollanyi/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Kollanyi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Secretary of the Army Christine Wormuth looks over the latest version of the M1A2 Abrams main battle tank as she tours the Joint Systems Manufacturing Center on Feb. 16, 2023, in Lima, Ohio. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

President Biden on Wednesday announces the signing of a $95 billion military assistance package for Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan. Ukraine says the aid is critical as it seeks to regain momentum on the battlefield from Russia. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Denys Shmyhal, Ukraine's Prime Minister, at NPR in Washington, D.C. Mhari Shaw for NPR hide caption

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Mhari Shaw for NPR

Denys Shmyhal, Ukraine's Prime Minister, at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. Mhari Shaw for NPR hide caption

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Mhari Shaw for NPR

Ukraine's prime minister says, if passed, $60B U.S. aid package will be critical

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A Milestone for a Major International Alliance and an Olympic Music Controversy

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Serhii Chaus, the mayor of the eastern Ukrainian city of Chasiv Yar, arrives at a bread delivery location on the outskirts of town. Chaus goes daily into the embattled town to deliver supplies and meet residents who choose to stay there as Russian forces are approaching the area. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

A mayor in Ukraine aids his town's few remaining people, as Russia closes in

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Students leave the underground school built in a Kharkiv subway station to board a bus home. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Ukraine's Kharkiv moves classrooms underground so kids survive Russian attacks

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A Ukrainian policeman (R) walks next to 84-year-old resident Mykola (L) pushing his bicycle on a street in the frontline town of Chasiv Yar, in the Donetsk region on October 11, 2023, amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Explosions are near-constant in the small town, whose buildings are scored with holes from shelling. Genya Savilov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Genya Savilov/AFP via Getty Images

A Visit to a Town Under Fire in Eastern Ukraine

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Ukrainian emergency workers clear the debris at the site of Russia's air attack, in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, Friday, March 22, 2024. Andriy Andriyenko/AP hide caption

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Andriy Andriyenko/AP

What to do with Russia's Frozen $300 Billion; A Trek in Morocco's Atlas Mountains

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U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken (right) stands with Swedish Prime Minister Ulf Kristersson before presenting Sweden's NATO Instruments of Accession in the Benjamin Franklin Room at the State Department on Thursday in Washington Jess Rapfogel/AP hide caption

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Jess Rapfogel/AP

Lytvynova stands near an apartment building in her Kyiv neighborhood that was damaged by multiple Russian strikes over the course of the war. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Russian President Vladimir Putin gets off a Tu-160M strategic bomber after a flight in Kazan, Russia, on Thursday. Dmitry Azarov/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP hide caption

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Dmitry Azarov/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

Clockwise from top left: lawyer Liudmyla Lysenko in Kyiv; restaurant co-owner Iryna Savchenko in Kramatorsk; tour guide Artem Vasyuta in Odesa; homemaker Nataliya Kucherenko in the Sumy region; obstetrician Iryna Kulbach in Dnipro; and architect Max Rozenfeld in Kharkiv. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

People visit the graves of fallen soldiers in commemoration as citizens and families of Ukrainian servicemen who killed during Russia-Ukraine war, take part in a ceremony to honor the memory of fallen soldiers on the eve of the 2nd anniversary of the Russian-Ukrainian war, where 'rays of remembrance' are lit into the sky above the Lychakiv Cemetery in Lviv, Ukraine, February 23, 2024. Pavlo Palamarchuk/Anadolu via Getty Images hide caption

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Pavlo Palamarchuk/Anadolu via Getty Images

The Russian Invasion of Ukraine, Two Years On

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