Ukraine invasion — explained The roots of Russia's invasion of Ukraine go back decades and run deep. The current conflict is more than one country taking over another; it is — in the words of one U.S. official — a shift in "the world order."
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Ukraine invasion — explained

Ukrainian first lady Olena Zelenska on the front cover of Vogue, photographed by Annie Leibovitz. Entitled "Portrait of Bravery," the spread and accompanying interview paint Zelenska as a woman stepping up to the challenge of her many roles in this war. Screenshot by NPR/Annie Leibovitz/Vogue hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR/Annie Leibovitz/Vogue

Ukraine's first lady posed for 'Vogue' and sparked discussion on how to #SitLikeAGirl

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The Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in Ukraine's Enerhodar, Zaporizhzhia region, is seen through barbed wire on the embankment in Nikopol, Dnipropetrovsk region, central Ukraine, on July 20. Russian soldiers have been shelling Nikopol from the premises of the nuclear power plant. Dmytro Smolyenko/Future Publishing via Getty Images hide caption

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Dmytro Smolyenko/Future Publishing via Getty Images

Over the river from a Russian-occupied nuclear plant, a Ukrainian town fears a spill

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Smoke rises after explosions were heard from the direction of a Russian military airbase near Novofedorivka, Crimea, in this still image obtained by Reuters Tuesday. Obtained by Reuters/via Reuters hide caption

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Obtained by Reuters/via Reuters

A Russian serviceman patrols Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Station on May 1. A series of exchanges in recent weeks has made conditions at the plant more dangerous. Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images

Oleg Repnoy stands in front of his Evacuation 200 vehicle. "My job is to accompany these heroes on their last trip home," he says. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

These Ukrainian volunteers recover soldiers' bodies to return them to their families

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Ukrainian soldiers led NPR's team into the forest in the "gray zone" where they dug one of the defensive trenches used to stall Russia's advance. Brian Mann/NPR hide caption

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Brian Mann/NPR

In the 'gray zone' outside Kherson, Ukraine's soldiers pay a terrible price

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Senior Crisis Advisor of Amnesty International Donatella Rovera (center) released a report August 4, 2022 condemning the Ukrainian army for putting civilians at risk, a possible war crime. Dogukan Keskinkilic/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Dogukan Keskinkilic/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin hands flowers to Alina Kabaeva after awarding her with an Order of Friendship during a ceremony at the Kremlin in June 2001. Sergei Chirikov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Chirikov/AFP via Getty Images

Inside the workshop and showroom of Giovanna Alessandro, in Chernivtsi, Ukraine. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

Ukraine's wedding dress industry is alive and well, despite the war

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As Ukraine mounts its first major offensive against Russia, 29-year-old Col. Serhiy Shatalov leads a battalion of 600 men in some of the heaviest fighting. "This is war," he says. "You cannot predict nothing, absolutely nothing." Brian Mann/NPR hide caption

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Brian Mann/NPR

A young officer hopes to turn the tide of war, as Ukraine fights to retake a key city

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A member of a Ukrainian military surveillance team gets ready to launch a drone from a wheat field in southern Ukraine. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

In the Russia-Ukraine war, drones are one of the most powerful weapons

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Grain fields backdropped by a power plant in the Donetsk region of eastern Ukraine on Friday. Nariman El-Mofty/AP hide caption

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Nariman El-Mofty/AP

Russia strikes Ukraine's Black Sea port of Odesa hours after grain deals signed

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