Reproductive rights in America The Supreme Court could overturn the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, a move that would effectively end federal protection for abortion rights.
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Reproductive rights in America

Abortion rights activists at the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. on March 26, the day the case about the abortion drug mifepristone was heard. The number of abortions in the U.S. increased, a study says, surprising researchers. Drew Angerer/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/AFP via Getty Images

Despite state bans, abortions nationwide are up, driven by telehealth

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Employers are required to make accommodations for pregnant women and new moms like time off for doctor's appointments. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

An exam room is seen inside Planned Parenthood in March 2023. Republican attorneys general from 17 states filed a lawsuit on Thursday, challenging new federal rules entitling workers to time off and other accommodations for abortions, calling the rules an illegal interpretation of a 2022 federal law. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

The Supreme Court will hear another case about abortion rights on Wednesday. Protestors gathered outside the court last month when the case before the justices involved abortion pills. Tom Brenner for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Brenner for The Washington Post/Getty Images

ProLife Across America, a national nonprofit, has placed multiple anti-abortion billboards in Rapid City, South Dakota. Arielle Zionts/KFF Health News hide caption

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Arielle Zionts/KFF Health News

Access to the abortion drug mifepristone could soon be limited by the Supreme Court for the whole country. Here, a nurse practitioner works at an Illinois clinic that offers telehealth abortion. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Abortion pills that patients got via telehealth and the mail are safe, study finds

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The Supreme Court will hear the case against the abortion pill mifepristone on March 26. It's part of a two-drug regimen with misoprostol for abortions in the first 10 weeks of pregnancy. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Research at the heart of a federal case against the abortion pill has been retracted

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The scene at the U.S. Supreme Court on the day it overturned Roe v. Wade in June 2022. Researchers estimate that 64,565 rape-caused pregnancies have occurred in states that banned abortion since then. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Raped, pregnant and in an abortion ban state? Researchers gauge how often it happens

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Elizabeth Weller speaks at a press conference in Austin, Texas on July 19. She's one of 20 women suing the state after being denied abortions despite serious pregnancy complications. Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images

Center for Reproductive Rights attorney Molly Duane speaks before the Texas Supreme Court in Austin on Nov. 28. The court ruled in a different abortion case on Monday. Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images

Kate Cox and her husband were expecting their third child when they got a devastating fetal diagnosis last week. She is also having problems threatening her own health. A judge said Thursday she has permission to end her pregnancy. Cox family hide caption

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Cox family

When the Center for Reproductive Rights first announced the lawsuit against Texas in March, there were five patient plaintiffs. Now there are 20. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Texas abortion case heard before state's highest court, as more women join lawsuit

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A #RestoreRoe rally outside Michigan's capitol in Lansing in Sept. 2022. Voters overwhelmingly approved enshrining abortion rights in the state constitution later that year. JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP via Getty Images

A poll worker has an "Ohio Voted" sticker on her shirt during early in-person voting at the Hamilton County Board of Elections in Cincinnati on Oct. 11. Ohio has a constitutional amendment before voters this year that would include reproductive health protections in the state's constitution, including abortion rights. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Abortion is on the ballot in Ohio. The results could signal what's ahead for 2024

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Anti-abortion demonstrators gather outside Planned Parenthood's Water Street Health Center in Milwaukee on Monday, Sept. 2023. Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin began offering abortions at the clinic that day after not doing so for more than a year. Margaret Faust/ WPR hide caption

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Margaret Faust/ WPR

Demonstrators rally to mark the first anniversary of the US Supreme Court ruling in the Dobbs v Women's Health Organization case in Washington, DC on June 24, 2023. ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

Abortion access could continue to change in year 2 after the overturn of Roe v. Wade

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Demonstrators protest about abortion outside the Supreme Court in Washington, June 24, 2022. In the year since, approximately 22 million women, girls and other people of reproductive age now live in states where abortion access is heavily restricted or totally inaccessible. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Dr. Sarah Prager and Dr. Kelly Quinley work together for the nonprofit TEAMM, Training, Education and Advocacy in Miscarriage Management, which operates on the premise that "many people experience miscarriage before they're established with an OBGYN." Rosem Morton for NPR hide caption

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Rosem Morton for NPR