Reproductive rights in America The Supreme Court could overturn the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, a move that would effectively end federal protection for abortion rights.
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Reproductive rights in America

District Attorney José Garza, pictured in Austin, Texas, in 2021. He is one of nearly 90 elected prosecutors from across the country who has publicly pledged not to prosecute those seeking or providing abortions. The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post via Getty Images

This Texas district attorney is one of dozens who have vowed not to prosecute abortion

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An abortion-rights activist holds up a flare outside the Constitutional Court in Bogotá, Colombia, in February. The court later ruled that people can get abortions until the 24th week of pregnancy without any permits from lawyers or doctors. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Fernando Vergara/AP

Abortion rights protesters in Louisville, Ky., after the Supreme Court announced it had voted to overturn Roe v. Wade. On Monday, abortion rights advocates filed a lawsuit arguing that the Kentucky state constitution protects the right to abortion. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Megan Thee Stallion, performing at Glastonbury Festival in Somerset, U.K. on Sat. June 25, 2022. During her set, Megan spoke out against the Supreme Court's decision overturning Roe v. Wade. Ben Birchall/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Birchall/PA Images via Getty Images

Abortion rights demonstrator Elizabeth White leads a chant in response to the Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization ruling in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 24, 2022. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Frustration at Biden and other Democrats grows among abortion-rights supporters

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The 2021 study found that 32% of pharmacies did not have levonorgestrel, a hormone that can prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex, in stock at all, and of the pharmacies that did have it on the shelf, 70% of them kept it in a locked box. Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer speaks to abortion-rights protesters Friday at a rally outside the state capitol in Lansing, Mich., following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Michigan shapes up as one of the next abortion battlefronts

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Protesters gather outside the U.S. Courthouse in Los Angeles to defend abortion rights on May 3, 2022, after a Supreme Court opinion overturning Roe v. Wade was leaked. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat who is up for reelection this fall, speaks to abortion-rights protesters at a rally following the U.S Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade outside the state capitol in Lansing, Mich., Friday, June 24, 2022. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Lee Mitchell had three abortions before Roe v. Wade made it legal. Now she plans to volunteer as a driver and host for women who travel to California from other states where the procedure is banned. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED