Taste Buddies: Short Wave Explores The Science Of Flavor Short Wave explores the five tastes commonly recognized ... and the frontiers of the science beyond those five.
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Taste Buddies: Short Wave Explores The Science Of Flavor

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TASTE BUDDIES: No Sugarcoating How Sweet Affects The Brain

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TASTE BUDDIES: Pucker Up! It's The Science Of Sour

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TASTE BUDDIES: Why Bitter Tastes Better For Some

Love the bitter bite of dark chocolate, leafy greens or black licorice? Your genetics may be the reason why. Today on the show, host Aaron Scott talks to scientist Masha Niv about how our bitter taste buds work and how a simple taste test can predict your tolerance for some bitter things. Plus, what bitter receptors elsewhere in the body have to do with your health.

TASTE BUDDIES: Why Bitter Tastes Better For Some

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TASTE BUDDIES: Y U Salty?

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TASTE BUDDIES: The Origins Of Umami

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TASTE BUDDIES: Science of Sour

Pucker up, duderinos! Short Wave's kicking off a series on taste we're calling, "Taste Buddies." In today's episode, we meet Atlantic science writer Katherine Wu and together, we take a tour through the mysteries of sourness — complete with a fun taste test. Along the way, Katie serves up some hypotheses for the evolution of sour taste because, as Katie explains in her article, "The Paradox of Sour," researchers still have a lot to learn about this weird taste.

TASTE BUDDIES: Science of Sour

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