Inflation at a 40-year high Prices rise at a pace not seen in 40 years.
Twenty dollar bills sit in a wallet.
Special Series

America In The Grip Of Inflation

Who is to blame for inflation? Some say greedy corporations are the culprits. Peter Ruck/BIPs/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Ruck/BIPs/Getty Images

The mystery of rising prices. Are greedy corporations to blame for inflation?

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Due to high inflation this year, NPR's Business desk shares cheaper dishes to substitute for Thanksgiving stables. Maansi Srivastava/NPR hide caption

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Maansi Srivastava/NPR

Inflation won't win Thanksgiving: Here's NPR's plan to help you save on a meal

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The man in black from the 1987 film, The Princess Bride, captures the same kind of hopeless dilemma many governments are facing, choosing between addressing inflation and addressing a possible coming recession. 20th Century Fox hide caption

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20th Century Fox

Recession or Inflation? Governments around the world must pick their poison

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Inflation is coming from inside the house. Rising prices are forcing tough decisions. Andriy Onufriyenko/Getty Images hide caption

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Andriy Onufriyenko/Getty Images

You can run, but you can't hide: Inflation is busting budgets, and killing joy too

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Mike Johansen stands by the door of the camping trailer where the couple is living while they wait for construction on their new home to be finished. Andrea Johansen hide caption

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Andrea Johansen

With mortgage rates near 7%, the housing party is over. Now it's hangover time

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In happier times, Susan Morrison and her husband Calvin liked to vacation in their motor home. But they've had to park it this year because of the high cost of diesel fuel. Susan Morrison/Susan Morrison hide caption

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Susan Morrison/Susan Morrison

Americans are paying more and getting less as inflation hits home

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Katrina Wooten signed a contract to buy this home that's under construction near Gainesville, Fla. Then mortgage rates jumped sharply higher. Katrina Wooten hide caption

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Katrina Wooten

Adjustable rate mortgages can be cheaper but risky. Here's what you need to know

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The SolDias ice cream stores in the Dallas-Fort Worth area noticed some customers were downsizing their orders this summer. The chain is exploring ways to cut costs to keep prices in reach. Courtesy of Victor Garcia hide caption

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Courtesy of Victor Garcia

These are some of the ways inflation is changing Americans' spending habits

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A driver pumps gas at a Gulf gas station in Lynnfield, Mass., on July 19. Gasoline prices are dropping, which is helping bring down inflation. But the cost of many other things are still climbing. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Inflation is cooling thanks to gas prices, but many things still cost a lot more

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People shop for school supplies at a Target store in Miami, Fla., on July 27. Marta Lavandier/AP hide caption

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Marta Lavandier/AP

Binders, backpacks... and inflation are on this year's back-to-school shopping list

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Gas prices are displayed on a sign at a gas station in Williams, Ariz., on Wednesday, July 6, 2022. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

No retreat in the summer heat. Inflation blistering at 9.1% in June

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Johnny Navarro sits on the hood of his recently purchased 2014 Lexus. Johnny Navarro hide caption

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Johnny Navarro

Monthly car payments have crossed a record $700. What that means

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Ari and TR Brooks stood on the land where their new home would be built the day they agreed to buy it back in February of 2021. But the home is still not completed and mortgage rates have risen dramatically. TR Brooks hide caption

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TR Brooks

The pain of rising mortgage rates when you're waiting for your home to be built

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell looks on after taking the oath of office for his second term at the helm of the central bank at the Fed's headquarters in Washington, D.C., on May 23. The Fed raised interest rates by three-quarters of a percentage point on Wednesday. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The Fed delivers biggest interest rate hike in decades to combat surging inflation

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A customer shops at a grocery store in San Rafael, Calif., on June 8. Inflation has surged to its highest rate in nearly 40 years, and Americans are having to adjust some of their spending patterns. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Inflation soars to an over 40-year high. These are the ways Americans are coping

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The soaring costs of basic necessities such as food and housing are disproportionately hitting people with lower incomes. Here, a house is available for rent in Los Angeles on March 15. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Inflation may be easing — but low-income people are still paying the steepest prices

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A shopper walks through a grocery store in Washington, D.C, on March 13. Surging inflation poses a particular challenge for working-class families, impacting the cost of basic necessities such as groceries. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

How soaring inflation forces stark choices

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