Short Wave: Black Excellence In STEM Diversity, equity and inclusion are core to the Short Wave mission. We know that everything is science, and science is for everyone. Here, we're highlighting the Black researchers changing and challenging the STEM fields.
Special Series

Short Wave: Black Excellence In STEM

Thursday

LOS ANGELES - JAN 8: Brent Spiner as Lt. Commander Data in the STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION episode, "The Hunted." Season 3, ep 11. Original air date, 1/8/90. (Photo by CBS via Getty Images) CBS Photo Archive/CBS via Getty Images hide caption

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CBS Photo Archive/CBS via Getty Images

Monday

Physicist Desiré Whitmore teaches workshops to help teachers better communicate science. As part of that, Desiré uses optical illusions to explain how social blind spots come into play in the classroom. Scott Barbour/Getty Images for NGV hide caption

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Scott Barbour/Getty Images for NGV

Wednesday

IBRAHIM CHALHOUB/AFP via Getty Images

The ancient night sky and the earliest astronomers

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Thursday

Members of MISS work up a shark. Cliff Hawkins/Field School hide caption

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Cliff Hawkins/Field School

How Women Of Color Created Community In The Shark Sciences

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Wednesday

People take a moment to enjoy the public art installation of illuminated seesaws unveiled by Garment District Alliance along Broadway on January 30, 2020 in New York City. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

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David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Tuesday

Abra Lee is a horticulturalist and studies U.S. gardening history. She fondly remembers her own relatives' gardens as holding a special place in horticultural history. Carlos Alejandro/Abra Lee hide caption

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Carlos Alejandro/Abra Lee

Monday

A screenshot from Tina Lasisi's presentation, "Quantifying hair morphology with new methods in sample preparation and image analysis," for the Penn State University Grad School Exhibition, 2020. Tina Lasisi hide caption

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Tina Lasisi

How to Talk About Hair Like a Scientist

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Friday

For a scientific experiment, a person sits in front of a computer, and an EEG measures the electrical signals released by neurons in their brain. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Micro Wave: I'll Peanut Jam Your Brain

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Thursday

Facial recognition researcher Joy Buolamwini stands for a portrait behind a mask she had to use so that software could detect her face. Buolamwini's research has uncovered racial and gender bias in facial analysis tools sold by companies such as Amazon that have a hard time recognizing certain faces, especially darker-skinned women. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Wednesday

Until Henrietta Lacks' cells came along, whenever human cells were put in a lab dish, they would die immediately or reproduce only a few times. HeLa cells, by contrast, grew indefinitely. National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research via AP hide caption

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National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research via AP

Tuesday

Brain Trouble, the second book in The Magnificent Makers series. Penguin Random House hide caption

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Penguin Random House

The Creation Of The Magnificent Makers

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Friday

Stevica Mrdja/EyeEm/Getty Images

A Short Wave Guide To Good — And Bad — TV Forensics

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Tuesday

Dajae Williams is a quality engineer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab. "I create music that fuses hip-hop and math as a tool to encourage underprivileged youth to explore STEM." NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

This NASA Engineer Is Bringing Math And Science To Hip Hop

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Monday

Dots of orbital debris are visible in this image of the Lunar Module Challenger from the Apollo 17 spacecraft, after docking maneuvers. The debris is from the Saturn S-IVB stage separation. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Wednesday

Dr. Jean-Jacques Muyembe first encountered Ebola in 1976, before it had been identified. Since then, from his post at the Congo National Institute for Biomedical Research, he has led the global search for a cure. Samantha Reinders/Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders/Samantha Reinders for NPR