Days & Weeks Personal stories of lives changed by abortion restrictions in the post-Roe era
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Days & Weeks

Dr. Austin Dennard at her home in Dallas in May. She is one of 13 patients and two other doctors suing Texas over its abortion bans. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

For one Texas doctor, abortion bans are personal and professional

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Two mothers faced vastly different outcomes when they got pregnant and needed medical care in Texas. Nitashia Johnson and Danielle Villasana for NPR hide caption

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Nitashia Johnson and Danielle Villasana for NPR

In post-Roe Texas, 2 mothers with traumatic pregnancies walk very different paths

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Dustin and Jaci Statton in an engagement photo from 2021. Jaci found out she had a partial molar pregnancy and couldn't get the abortion she needed in Oklahoma. They traveled to Kansas for care. Rachel Megan Photography hide caption

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Rachel Megan Photography

'I'll lose my family.' A husband's dread during an abortion ordeal in Oklahoma

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Paige Vickers for NPR

Fear of pregnancy: One teen's story in post-Roe America

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Samantha Casiano and Luis Villasana and had a baby last week who died shortly after birth. The fatal condition was diagnosed at 20 weeks of pregnancy. When Casiano asked her OB-GYN what her options were, she was told, "You don't have any options. You have to go on with your pregnancy." Kelsey Durell hide caption

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Kelsey Durell

A Good Friday funeral in Texas. Baby Halo's parents had few choices in post-Roe Texas

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Lauren Miller, of Dallas, Texas, says that her state's abortion laws added to the stress and turmoil her family faced after one of her twins was diagnosed with a fatal condition in utero. Nitashia Johnson for NPR hide caption

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Nitashia Johnson for NPR

3 abortion bans in Texas leave doctors 'talking in code' to pregnant patients

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Lauren Miller at her home in Dallas, in January 2023. When she was 15 weeks pregnant, she traveled to Colorado to have a "selective reduction" abortion, after one of her twins was diagnosed with a fatal condition. Nitashia Johnson for NPR hide caption

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Nitashia Johnson for NPR

To safeguard healthy twin in utero, she had to 'escape' Texas for abortion procedure

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Kaitlyn and Landon Joshua were worried for Kaitlyn's health when she started to bleed heavily and had labor-like pains early in her pregnancy. But two different emergency rooms she went to wouldn't confirm she was miscarrying or explain her treatment options. Claire Bangser for NPR hide caption

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Claire Bangser for NPR

Bleeding and in pain, she couldn't get 2 Louisiana ERs to answer: Is it a miscarriage?

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Paige Vickers for NPR

Because of Wisconsin's abortion ban, one mother gave up trying for another child

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Weeks after her miscarriage was confirmed, Christina Zielke started bleeding heavily while on a trip out of town. At an ER in Ohio, she was given tests but no treatment, and discharged soon after, still bleeding. She says she was told the hospital needed proof there was no fetal development. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Her miscarriage left her bleeding profusely. An Ohio ER sent her home to wait

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Karla Renée was 18 weeks into her pregnancy when she and her husband Sam learned that the fetus had a serious genetic anomaly that could lead to severe physical and mental disabilities. They were faced with an enormous and pressing decision. In North Carolina, where they live, the current law forbids abortion after 20 weeks gestational age. Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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Max Posner/NPR

At 18 weeks pregnant, she faced an immense decision with just days to make it

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Elizabeth and James Weller at their home in Houston two months after losing their baby girl due to a premature rupture of membranes. Elizabeth could not receive the medical care she needed until several days later because of a Texas law that banned abortion after six weeks. Julia Robinson for NPR hide caption

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Julia Robinson for NPR

Because of Texas' abortion law, her wanted pregnancy became a medical nightmare

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