FIFA World Cup 2022 NPR's coverage of the men's soccer tournament in Qatar.
Special Series

FIFA World Cup 2022

USA men's soccer team coach Gregg Berhalter speaks during a news conference at the Qatar National Convention Center in Doha on Dec. 2, 2022. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Japan played like they can beat anyone (and they did, topping both Spain and Germany). Brazil is still the favorite to win it all, even as they wait to see if their star striker Neymar can return from injury. And the U.S., led by team captain Tyler Adams, has looked better than expected. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images; Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images; Patrick T. Fallon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images; Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images; Patrick T. Fallon/AFP/Getty Images

Anish Adhikari, now 26, worked construction jobs in Qatar for 33 months in the lead-up to the World Cup. In this 2021 photo, he poses inside the new Lusail stadium, which he helped build and which will host the World Cup final on Dec. 18. Adhikari says the Nepali agent who got him the job misled him about working conditions in Qatar: "They sell a dream that's not reality." Anish Adhikari hide caption

toggle caption
Anish Adhikari

Death and dishonesty: Stories of two workers who built the World Cup stadiums in Qatar

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1140260086/1140260087" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Members of security, right, speak with two Iran supporters as they take away a flag reading "Woman life freedom" prior to the match between Wales and Iran on Nov. 25. Giuseppe Cacace/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Giuseppe Cacace/AFP via Getty Images

Christian Pulisic of the United States attends a news conference before a training session at Al-Gharafa SC Stadium, in Doha, Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022. Ashley Landis/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ashley Landis/AP

A woman at a protest in Qatar holds up a sign bearing the name of Mahsa Amini, the 22-year-old Iranian woman whose death in police custody sparked a nationwide protest movement. Francisco Seco/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Francisco Seco/AP

Gregg Berhalter, head coach of United States team, looks on during a training session on Monday in Doha, Qatar. The U.S. faces Iran in a crucial match on Tuesday. Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images

What's at stake as the U.S. faces Iran at the World Cup

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139558151/1139640546" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Two anti-riot police officers wave the Iranian flags during a street celebration after Iran defeated Wales in Qatar's World Cup, at Sadeghieh Sq. in Tehran, Iran, Friday, Nov. 25, 2022. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Vahid Salemi/AP

Argentina's Lionel Messi, center, celebrates at the end of the World Cup group C soccer match between Argentina and Mexico, at the Lusail Stadium in Lusail, Qatar, on Saturday. Argentina won 2-0. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Moises Castillo/AP

Tim Weah of the United States celebrates after scoring the team's goal during a World Cup match against Wales on November 21, 2022 in Doha, Qatar. Wales and the U-S finished 1-1. Ryan Pierse/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

For Tim Weah, a World Cup goal capped a family journey. Now he's ready for England

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139179876/1139186155" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Fans arrive to the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil round of 16 match between Brazil and Chile at Estadio Mineirão in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on June 28, 2014. Pedro Vilela/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pedro Vilela/Getty Images

Why some Brazilians won't be wearing their national soccer colors for the World Cup

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1138956878/1139147103" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Japan's Ritsu Doan scores his side's first goal Wednesday against Germany's goalkeeper Manuel Neuer during a World Cup soccer match at the Khalifa International Stadium in Doha, Qatar. Matthias Schrader/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matthias Schrader/AP

Brazilian referee Raphael Claus gestures during the Qatar 2022 World Cup soccer match between England and Iran at the Khalifa International Stadium in Doha on Monday. Claus added 29 minutes of stoppage time to the game - part of a growing trend at this tournament. Paul Ellis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Ellis/AFP via Getty Images

Argentina's forward Lionel Messi reacts during his team's opening round 2-1 loss to Saudi Arabia at the 2022 World Cup in Qatar. Antonin Thuillier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Antonin Thuillier/AFP via Getty Images

Argentina's Lionel Messi reacts in disappointment Tuesday during the World Cup group C soccer match between Argentina and Saudi Arabia at the Lusail Stadium in Lusail, Qatar. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Natacha Pisarenko/AP