Invisibilia Stories about the unseen forces that shape human behavior
Trailer for Season 9 of Invisibilia
Special Series

Invisibilia

Stories about the unseen forces that shape human behavior

Her Incredible Sense Of Smell Is Helping Scientists Find New Ways To Diagnose Disease

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/820274501/820389400" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In the 1970s, professor Peter Kranz asked what would happen if students went around the room and said what they really thought about people of the other race. Leonardo Santamaria hide caption

toggle caption
Leonardo Santamaria

What 10 Students Learned From Having To Say Their Worst Thoughts On Race Out Loud

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/814960315/816658289" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Claudia Fung for NPR

We all walk around the world thinking of ourselves as individuals. But in this short animation, NPR's Invisibilia explores some of the ways in which we're all invisibly connected to one another. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lily Padula for NPR

How Microexpressions Can Make Moods Contagious

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/743408637/746951492" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Christina Chung for NPR

Invisibilia: For Some Teens With Debilitating Pain, The Treatment Is More Pain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/700823481/701553407" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Sara Wong for NPR

Invisibilia: Do the Patterns in Your Past Predict Your Future?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/597974076/598756672" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sara Wong for NPR

Invisibilia: We All Think We Know The People We Love. We're All Deluded

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/594023688/595967473" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sara Wong for NPR

Invisibilia: Inspired By 'American Idol,' Somali TV Show Aimed To Change The World

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/593593501/594364509" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sara Wong for NPR

Invisibilia: When Death Rocks Your World, Maybe You Jump Out Of A Plane

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/590933697/592196635" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Angie Wang for NPR

The Roots Of Consciousness: We're Of 2 Minds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/532920899/533102652" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

For two years, Hawkins let his app guide him around the globe, including a stop in Gortina, Slovenia. Courtesy of Max Hawkins hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Max Hawkins

Eager To Burst His Own Bubble, A Techie Made Apps To Randomize His Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/531796329/532022889" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A psychologist argues people experience emotions differently. For instance, fear might make some people cry while for others, it could elicit laughter. Sara Wong for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sara Wong for NPR
Marina Muun for NPR

Invisibilia: A Man Finds An Explosive Emotion Locked In A Word

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529876861/531004399" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Manual Cinema/NPR

She Offered The Robber A Glass Of Wine, And That Flipped The Script

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485843453/486854449" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

William Kitt has lived in a studio apartment in New York owned by the nonprofit Broadway Housing Communities for 13 years, after decades of living on the streets. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Bryan Thomas for NPR

Invisibilia: For An Artist, A Room Of His Own Is A Lifesaver

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484077402/484284839" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript