Finding Time Take a journey through the fourth dimension to learn what makes us tick.
Finding Time is a new series that explores every dimension of the fourth dimension.
Special Series

Finding Time

Take a journey through the fourth dimension to learn what makes us tick
DrAfter123/Getty Images

How did COVID warp our sense of time? It's a matter of perception

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1127361435/1142704867" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Far from the Earth, time gets extremely weird. Black holes can cause it to stretch and even break down entirely. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Researchers say time is an illusion. So why are we all obsessed with it?

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139780043/1143312878" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Islenia Milien for NPR

To reignite the joy of childhood, learn to live on 'toddler time'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139781674/1151270503" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Boats are pushed up on a causeway after Hurricane Ian passed through the area on September 29, 2022 in Fort Myers, Florida. Research suggests support for some climate policies increases immediately after climate-driven disasters such as Ian. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Jazz saxophonist Joshua Redman plays in 2019. Swing is an essential component of nearly all kinds of jazz music. Physicists think that subtle nuances in the timing of soloists are key to creating that propulsive swing feel. Bernd Thissen/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

toggle caption
Bernd Thissen/picture alliance via Getty Image

What makes that song swing? At last, physicists unravel a jazz mystery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139783203/1149719650" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Islenia Milien for NPR

In praise of being late: The upside of spurning the clock

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139782676/1148489010" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Stanford University/Getty Images

Zircon: The Keeper Of Earth's Time

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1147830707/1147895863" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A pile of debris from Hurricane Ian rises behind a line of people waiting to vote in Fort Myers, Fla., in November 2022. Research suggests support for some climate policies increases immediately after climate-driven disasters such as Ian. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rebecca Blackwell/AP

How our perception of time shapes our approach to climate change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139782291/1146960975" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Rose Wong for NPR

Time is fleeting. Here's how to stay on track with New Year's goals

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1144894026/1146543192" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A thin, polished slice of a rock collected from the Jack Hills of Western Australia, viewed through a special microscope equipped with a gypsum plate that shows the rainbow spectrum of quartz that makes up the rock. Whereas the rocks at the Jack Hills are greater than 99% quartz, the remaining 1% of material includes the precious zircons. Michael Ackerson/Smithsonian hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Ackerson/Smithsonian

To peer into Earth's deep time, meet a hardy mineral known as the Time Lord

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139782011/1145934915" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Humans have an elegant and intricate system of internal processes that help our bodies keep time, with exposure to sunlight, caffeine and meal timing all playing a role. But that doesn't account for "precision waking." Sarah Mosquera/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Mosquera/NPR

I usually wake up just ahead of my alarm. What's up with that?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139781557/1145509307" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Laura Gao for NPR

Can dogs smell time? Just ask Donut the dog

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139781319/1144942214" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Malte Mueller/fStop/Getty Images

For 'time cells' in the brain, what matters is what happens in the moment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139780745/1144821817" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Certain cells within Crittenden's retinas that contain melanopsin help his brain to detect light, even if what he sees is darkness. Among other things, these light-detecting cells help his body regulate his sleep cycles. Marta Iwanek for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Marta Iwanek for NPR

Perceiving without seeing: How light resets your internal clock

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139780998/1143814953" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript