Black History Month 2023 February is Black History Month in the U.S., and this year's theme is "Black Resistance." Throughout the month, NPR will compile a list of stories, music performances, podcasts and other content that chronicles the Black American experience.

Black History Month 2023

A screenshot from the Melvin Van Peebles film, Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song. Yeah hide caption

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Yeah

How Black resistance has been depicted in films over the years

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"It's not all just about anger and aggression," Zulu's Anaiah Lei (far left) says, "I'm kind of tired of being expected to express that when I want to express love." Alice Baxley/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Alice Baxley/Courtesy of the artist

LOS ANGELES - JAN 8: Brent Spiner as Lt. Commander Data in the STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION episode, "The Hunted." Season 3, ep 11. Original air date, 1/8/90. (Photo by CBS via Getty Images) CBS Photo Archive/CBS via Getty Images hide caption

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CBS Photo Archive/CBS via Getty Images

The Woodson family members at the Woodson reconciliation ceremony in 1998. Courtesy of Craig Woodson hide caption

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Courtesy of Craig Woodson

1 side owned slaves. The other side started Black History Month. How a family heals

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The documentary Wattstax celebrates its 50th anniversary this month. It will be returning to theaters alongside a new box set called Soul'd Out: The Complete Wattstax Collection. Courtesy of Stax Records and Craft Recordings hide caption

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Courtesy of Stax Records and Craft Recordings

Pulse oximeters are known to be biased against darker skin tones. Kimani Toussaint is a physicist at Brown University working on an alternative to the pulse oximeter. Joshua Burrow/Kimani Toussaint hide caption

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Joshua Burrow/Kimani Toussaint

COVID-19 made pulse oximeters ubiquitous. Engineers are fixing their racial bias

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Stokely Carmichael, shown here in 1967, helped popularize the term "Black Power!" in 1966. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

How Stokely Carmichael and the Black Panthers changed the civil rights movement

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Physicist Desiré Whitmore teaches workshops to help teachers better communicate science. As part of that, Desiré uses optical illusions to explain how social blind spots come into play in the classroom. Scott Barbour/Getty Images for NGV hide caption

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Scott Barbour/Getty Images for NGV

What physical blind spots can teach us about social blind spots

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The Black Panthers march in protest of the trial of co-founder Huey P. Newton in Oakland, California. Bettmann/Getty Images hide caption

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and his administration rejected the original curriculum for the African American studies course in January. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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IBRAHIM CHALHOUB/AFP via Getty Images

The ancient night sky and the earliest astronomers

Moiya McTier says the night sky has been fueling humans' stories about the universe for a very long time, and informing how they explain the natural world. In fact, Moiya sees astronomy and folklore as two sides of the same coin.

The ancient night sky and the earliest astronomers

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