2 years of Russia-Ukraine war Russia launched its full-scale invasion of Ukraine in February 2022. Two years later, the war continues with no end in sight.
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2 years of Russia-Ukraine war

Serhii Chaus, the mayor of the eastern Ukrainian city of Chasiv Yar, arrives at a bread delivery location on the outskirts of town. Chaus goes daily into the embattled town to deliver supplies and meet residents who choose to stay there as Russian forces are approaching the area. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

A mayor in Ukraine aids his town's few remaining people, as Russia closes in

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Students leave the underground school built in a Kharkiv subway station to board a bus home. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Ukraine's Kharkiv moves classrooms underground so kids survive Russian attacks

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A priest prays over the coffin of Oleksandra "Sasha" Kuvshynova, a Ukrainian journalist killed while working for Fox News in March 2022. Her parents have sued Fox News alleging wrongful death, fraud and defamation. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Russian President Vladimir Putin gets off a Tu-160M strategic bomber after a flight in Kazan, Russia, on Thursday. Dmitry Azarov/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP hide caption

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Dmitry Azarov/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

Clockwise from top left: lawyer Liudmyla Lysenko in Kyiv; restaurant co-owner Iryna Savchenko in Kramatorsk; tour guide Artem Vasyuta in Odesa; homemaker Nataliya Kucherenko in the Sumy region; obstetrician Iryna Kulbach in Dnipro; and architect Max Rozenfeld in Kharkiv. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Armored car repair shop workers build an experimental version of a military vehicle in the facility of the Ukrainian Armor Design and Manufacturing Co. Oksana Parafeniuk for NPR hide caption

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Oksana Parafeniuk for NPR

With Western military aid increasingly uncertain, Ukraine builds its own weapons

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Olha Bilianska's husband was mobilized two years ago. Even after being injured, he is being redeployed. "Some people still believe that this war won't get them," Bilianska says. "It will get them. This war is cruel." Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR