Hey Ladies: Being A Woman Musician Today We surveyed hundreds of women musicians working today.
Thievery Corporation live in concert; photo by Shantel Mitchell
Special Series

Hey Ladies: Being A Woman Musician Today

A survey of hundreds of women musicians working today.

Four members of the International Sweethearts of Rhythm, circa 1944. Rosalind Cron, one of the group's first white members, stands at the far left. International Sweethearts of Rhythm Collection, Courtesy of the Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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International Sweethearts of Rhythm Collection, Courtesy of the Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution

America's 'Sweethearts': An All-Girl Band That Broke Racial Boundaries

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The Slits' Ari Up, who died on Oct. 20, was a true rock 'n' roll pioneer. Angel Ceballos/Blue Ghost Publicity hide caption

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Angel Ceballos/Blue Ghost Publicity

Drummer Terri Lyne Carrington's The Mosaic Project will be released in the U.S. early next year. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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courtesy of the artist

Women In Jazz: Taking Back All-Female Ensembles

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Marina Diamandis of Marina and The Diamonds performs live at the Reading Festival on August 27, 2010 in Reading, England. Simone Joyner/Getty Images hide caption

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Simone Joyner/Getty Images

Hey Ladies: Pop Stars Vs. Role Models

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Given that more women than men use social media, shouldn't the Twitter bird be pink? Mito Habe-Evans / NPR hide caption

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Mito Habe-Evans / NPR

Control Your Image: Women Musicians Seize On Social Media

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