Social Entrepreneurs: Taking On World Problems The past decade or so has seen explosive growth in the number of social entrepreneurs — innovators who take a business-like approach to solving social problems. NPR profiles some of these entrepreneurs.
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Social Entrepreneurs: Taking On World Problems

Read about innovators who take a business-like approach to solving social problems.

Jason Jones (left) with his roommates Joe Klein and Tamiko Panzella in their Oakland, Calif., apartment. Panzella and Klein are participating in a new program to provide housing to former inmates. Jones was released recently after nearly 14 years in prison. Courtesy of Tamiko Panzella hide caption

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Courtesy of Tamiko Panzella

From A Cell To A Home: Newly Released Inmates Matched With Welcoming Hosts

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Sachets like these, developed to market consumer goods to the poor, have become ubiquitous all over Asia. Jes Aznar for NPR hide caption

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Jes Aznar for NPR

A New Weapon In The War Against Plastic Waste

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Sally Deng for NPR

Why This Charity Isn't Afraid To Say It Failed

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Kolkata Woman Helps Children Of Sex Workers Break The Cycle

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Alicia Corman for NPR

Right-Wing Hate Groups Are Recruiting Video Gamers

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The shells are trucked over to Brooklyn's Greenpoint neighborhood and once a month are brought en masse to Governors Island in the heart of the New York Harbor. Billion Oyster Project has collected more than 1 million pounds of oyster shells so far. Courtesy of Agata Poniatowski hide caption

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Courtesy of Agata Poniatowski

Juan Pablo Romero (right), founder and director of Los Patojos, talks with current student Christopher Alvarado, who participates in the construction and maintenance of the new campus during the mornings in Jocotenango, Guatemala. James Rodriguez for NPR hide caption

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James Rodriguez for NPR

Seeds Of Maya Genius Grow In A New Kind Of School

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Third graders on board a floating school in Bangladesh run by the nonprofit group Shidhulai Swanirvar Sangstha. Mahmud Hossain Opu for NPR hide caption

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Mahmud Hossain Opu for NPR

'Floating Schools' Make Sure Kids Get To Class When The Water Rises

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Kennedy Odede (in blue shirt) is dancing for a good reason. The charity he and his wife started has been awarded the $2 million Hilton Humanitarian Prize. He's joined by residents of Kibera, the neighborhood in Nairobi where his nonprofit group provides educational, health and clean water services. Anwar Sadat hide caption

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Anwar Sadat

A Summer Camp For Sikh Youth

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More companies are stepping in to help their workers with a much cheaper way to get some emergency cash than payday loans. MHJ/Getty Images hide caption

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MHJ/Getty Images

Walmart And Others Offer Workers Payday Loan Alternative

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An employer in Indiana is piloting a program that offers a path to employment after failing a drug test. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Now Hiring: A Company Offers Drug Treatment And A Job To Addicted Applicants

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Jean Marie Rukundo and his wife, Theodosie Uwambajimana, with their 2-year-old daughter. They've nicknamed her "Rwamrec," the acronym for a resource center in Rwanda that taught Rukundo how to step up his game as a spouse and father. When he came with his wife to the delivery room for the child, she says that "touched my heart." Amy Yee for NPR hide caption

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Amy Yee for NPR

Teachers Sarah Lindenberg and Kara Cisco chat with Kelly Brown, the BARR coordinator at St. Louis Park. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

How More Meetings Might Be The Secret To Fixing High School

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Lilli Carré for NPR

Listen: Tristan Harris, founder of Center for Humane Technology, on Morning Edition

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Dr. Ronald Cirillo helps Deborah Hatfield fill out paperwork at a Florida clinic, before running a test to see whether she has hepatitis C. Daylina Miller/Health News Florida hide caption

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Daylina Miller/Health News Florida

From Retirement To The Front Lines Of Hepatitis C Treatment

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