Social Entrepreneurs: Taking On World Problems The past decade or so has seen explosive growth in the number of social entrepreneurs — innovators who take a business-like approach to solving social problems. NPR profiles some of these entrepreneurs.
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Social Entrepreneurs: Taking On World Problems

Read about innovators who take a business-like approach to solving social problems.

More companies are stepping in to help their workers with a much cheaper way to get some emergency cash than payday loans. MHJ/Getty Images hide caption

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MHJ/Getty Images

Walmart And Others Offer Workers Payday Loan Alternative

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An employer in Indiana is piloting a program that offers a path to employment after failing a drug test. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Now Hiring: A Company Offers Drug Treatment And A Job To Addicted Applicants

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Jean Marie Rukundo and his wife, Theodosie Uwambajimana, with their 2-year-old daughter. They've nicknamed her "Rwamrec," the acronym for a resource center in Rwanda that taught Rukundo how to step up his game as a spouse and father. When he came with his wife to the delivery room for the child, she says that "touched my heart." Amy Yee for NPR hide caption

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Amy Yee for NPR

Teachers Sarah Lindenberg and Kara Cisco chat with Kelly Brown, the BARR coordinator at St. Louis Park. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

How More Meetings Might Be The Secret To Fixing High School

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Lilli Carré for NPR

Listen: Tristan Harris, founder of Center for Humane Technology, on Morning Edition

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After an earthen floor is put down, it is covered with an oil-based floor sealant that hardens and makes it easy to clean. Jacques Nkinzingabo/Courtesy of EarthEnable hide caption

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Jacques Nkinzingabo/Courtesy of EarthEnable

The typical asymmetrical lymphedema (lower limb swelling) seen in podoconiosis. The skin on the affected limbs is thickened with warty and mossy nodules. The toes are disfigured with joint fixation typical of advanced podoconiosis disease. Christine Kihembo/ASTMH & AJTMH hide caption

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Christine Kihembo/ASTMH & AJTMH

Gabriel Zepeda (right) makes an all-terrain wheelchair. He's been making wheelchairs for low-income Mexicans for 27 years. Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR hide caption

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Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR

Mexico And U.S. Team Up To Create Low-Cost Wheelchairs

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Advanced Placement Exam Scores In Alabama On The Rise

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Gordon (left) teaches Telly how to control his jealousy with breathing exercises. Courtesy of Sesame Workshop hide caption

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Courtesy of Sesame Workshop

When Elmo And Big Bird Talk To Refugees

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After a couple of stints behind bars, Angel LaCourt (right) is now a trainer at InnerCity Weightlifting in Boston. Here he works with Bill Gramby, who recently had a stroke and is working out to build strength and stamina. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

A Weightlifting Program Gives Ex-Cons A Chance At Change

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Virginia Tech Shooting Survivor On The 10th Anniversary

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Dr. C. David Molina reviewing medical records in the 1980s. He was a doctor first, then a health insurer. Courtesy of Molina Healthcare hide caption

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Courtesy of Molina Healthcare

This CEO's Small Insurance Firm Mostly Turned A Profit Under Obamacare. Here's How

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A student stands in one of the tiny houses created for flood victims in West Virginia. The homes, built by high school students, are fewer than 500 square feet. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

High School Students Build Tiny Houses For Flood Victims

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