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Sen. Tammy Duckworth walks across stage at the Democratic National Convention in 2016. She is the first senator to give birth while serving in office. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Plaques located in the gray matter of the brain are key indicators of Alzheimer's disease. Cecil Fox/Science Source hide caption

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Cecil Fox/Science Source

Scientists Push Plan To Change How Researchers Define Alzheimer's

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Physical therapist Ingrid Peele coaches Kim Brown through strengthening exercises to help her with her chronic pain, at the OSF Central Illinois Pain Center in Peoria. Kyle Travers/WFYI hide caption

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Kyle Travers/WFYI

The author of a new book, Doing Harm, argues that a pattern of gender bias in medicine means women's pain may be going undiagnosed. PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images

How 'Bad Medicine' Dismisses And Misdiagnoses Women's Symptoms

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Dr. Garen Wintemute at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center, says of the new authority given to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "There's no funding. There's no agreement to provide funding. There isn't even encouragement." Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Samples of blood and other bodily fluids at the coroner's office in Marion County, Ind., are tested for controlled substances. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Dr. Robert Redfield, named CDC director Wednesday, spoke during the Aid for AIDS "My Hero Gala" in New York City in 2013. Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Aid for Aids/Getty Images hide caption

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Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Aid for Aids/Getty Images

Wendy Root Askew with her husband Dominick Askew and their son. When the little boy (now 6) was born, Root Askew struggled with postpartum depression. She likes California's bill, she says, because it goes beyond mandatory screening; it would also require insurers to establish programs to help women get treatment. Courtesy of Wendy Root Askew hide caption

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Courtesy of Wendy Root Askew

Lawmakers Weigh Pros And Cons Of Mandatory Screening For Postpartum Depression

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A report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine says that abortion is safe but that "abortion specific regulations in many states create barriers to safe and effective care." Bryce Duffy/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryce Duffy/Getty Images

Landmark Report Concludes Abortion In U.S. Is Safe

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When Anne Soloviev, a retiree who lives in Washington, D.C., received a prescription to treat toenail fungus, she never thought to ask how much it cost. As it turned out, she was prescribed a topical medication costing almost $1,500. Cheryl Diaz Meyer for KHN hide caption

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Cheryl Diaz Meyer for KHN

Financial Side Effects From A Prescription For Toenail Fungus

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Dr. Lee Goldstein, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology, Ophthalmology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, & Biomedical Engineering at Boston University and Newton North High School Football player Alex Riviero speak on the front porch of Dr. Goldstein's home in Newton, Mass. Meredith Nierman/WGBH hide caption

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Meredith Nierman/WGBH

When A High School Football Player Meets A Brain Injury Researcher

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Mady Ohlman, who lives near Boston and has been sober for more than four years, says many drug users hit a point when the disease and the pursuit of illegal drugs crushes the will to live. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

How Many Opioid Overdoses Are Suicides?

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Francis Brauner was instrumental in helping launch a class-action lawsuit on behalf of current inmates at Louisiana's Angola prison, suing for care that allegedly caused them "needless pain and suffering." Charles A. Smith hide caption

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Charles A. Smith

Angola Prison Lawsuit Poses Question: What Kind Of Medical Care Do Inmates Deserve?

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Idaho Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter says Thursday's letter from the Trump administration "was not a rejection of our approach," but rather an invitation to keep talking about how to make Idaho's state-based health plans pass muster. Otto Kitsinger/AP hide caption

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Otto Kitsinger/AP
Sara Wong for NPR

Invisibilia: When Death Rocks Your World, Maybe You Jump Out Of A Plane

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A report from the RAND Corporation confirms there is very little scientific evidence for or against many gun policies. RAND hopes to lend researchers a hand with its new state-by-state database of gun laws. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Science Provides Few Facts On Effects Of Gun Policies, Report Finds

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Sens. Jon Tester, left, and Steve Daines, speaking together in Jardine, Mont., in August 2017. Both said recently they want the Indian Health Service to have new, strong leadership soon. Matthew Brown/AP Photo/Matthew Brown hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP Photo/Matthew Brown