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Shots - Featured Posts

Featured posts, as selected by Shots.

Chimps use sticks to poke into a mock termite mound to taste a sweet substance placed in the mound by keepers at Chimp Haven in Keithville, La. Today, caretakers say, more chimps in the U.S. live in accredited animal sanctuaries than in research facilities. Janet McConnaughey/AP hide caption

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Janet McConnaughey/AP

Too Frail To Retire? Humans Ponder The Fate Of Research Chimps

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A tinted transmission electron micrograph of Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria (light purple/black) inside a cell. Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S., with more than 1.7 million reported cases in 2017. Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source hide caption

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Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source

Screening for lung cancer can catch tumors but it can also produce false positives. Patients need to decide whether it's right for them, but doctors often don't know how to advise them. FS Productions/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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FS Productions/Getty Images/Blend Images

Brittany Williams, a doctoral candidate at the University of Georgia, started taking Truvada when she began dating a man living with HIV. Even though the relationship ended, she continues to take it. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

More testing for HIV infection is one of the steps needed to halt the spread of the virus. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Halting U.S. HIV Epidemic By 2030: Difficult But Doable

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Person undergoing a CAT scan in hospital with PET scan equipment. Emerging studies report findings of brain deterioration in females to be slower than that of males'. Johnny Greig/Getty Images hide caption

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Johnny Greig/Getty Images

Scans Show Female Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down

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A British study found that people who used e-cigarettes to quit smoking were more successful than those who tried nicotine patches and gum. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Study Found Vaping Beat Traditional Smoking-Cessation Options

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Ariel Davis for NPR

From Fruit Fly To Stink Eye: Searching For Anger's Animal Roots

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To tame your anger, it may help to take time to observe and name it. Ariel Davis for NPR hide caption

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Ariel Davis for NPR

Got Anger? Try Naming It To Tame It

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A filing by Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey detailed the Sackler family's role in Purdue Pharma's marketing of OxyContin. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

Surgeons performed more than 21,000 kidney transplants and 8,000 liver transplants in 2018, according the United Network for Organ Sharing. shapecharge/Getty Images hide caption

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shapecharge/Getty Images

A Surgeon Reflects On Death, Life And The 'Incredible Gift' Of Organ Transplant

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Robert and Tiffany Cano of San Tan Valley, Ariz., have a new marriage, a new house and a 10-month-old son, Brody. Since Brody was born, the Canos have racked up nearly $12,000 in medical debt. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Sarah Witter had two operations to repair bones in her lower left leg after a skiing accident last February. The second surgery was needed to replace a stabilizing plate that broke. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN
Kristen Uroda for NPR

If You Feel Thankful, Write It Down. It's Good For Your Health

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Research inspired by soccer headers has led to fresh insights into how the brain weathers hits to the head. Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images

Bad Vibes: How Hits To The Head Are Transferred To The Brain

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Teens' biological clock drives them to stay up late and sleep in. Most school start times don't accommodate that drive. Jasper Cole/Getty Images hide caption

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Jasper Cole/Getty Images

Sleepless No More In Seattle — Later School Start Time Pays Off For Teens

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Keri Blakinger spent nearly two years incarcerated on narcotics charges before becoming a criminal justice reporter for the Houston Chronicle. Nicole Hensley/Houston Chronicle hide caption

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Nicole Hensley/Houston Chronicle

From Convict To Criminal Justice Reporter: 'I Was So Lucky To Come Out Of This'

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The shortage is a nationwide problem. And the cause, according to the drug's manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline, is simple: "Unprecedented demand." Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images