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UCLA researchers are using a radioactive tracer, which binds to abnormal proteins in the brain, to see if it is possible to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy in living patients. Warmer colors in these PET scans indicate higher concentrations of the tracer. UCLA hide caption

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UCLA

Some critically ill patients who received a CAR-T cell treatment have remained cancer-free for as long as five years, researchers say. But the price is high. Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images

When the heart pushes too hard, as it does when blood pressure is elevated, it can cause damage that can lead to a stroke, says Dr. Walter Koroshetz. John Rensten/Getty Images hide caption

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John Rensten/Getty Images

Worried About Dementia? You Might Want to Check Your Blood Pressure

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Heat Making You Lethargic? Research Shows It Can Slow Your Brain, Too

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An increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide would lead to a decrease in the nutritional content of many foods, such as rice, seen here growing in Malaysia. Nik Wheeler/Getty Images hide caption

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Nik Wheeler/Getty Images

Sunscreens containing minerals like zinc oxide and titanium dioxide reflect the sun's rays away from skin and are a good alternative to chemicals that could be harmful to ocean reefs. Photo illustration by Eslah Attar/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Eslah Attar/NPR

Many Common Sunscreens May Harm Coral. Here's What To Use Instead

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Gilead Sciences makes Truvada, a medicine known generically as "pre-exposure prophylaxis," or PrEP. Consistent, daily doses of the drug are thought to reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90 percent. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

"If my life were to end next week ... I want to feel like I have made a contribution," said Carol Martin, seen here holding her 2018 Boston Marathon medal. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Americans are increasingly taking multiple drugs. And depression is a potential side effect of many of them. Glasshouse Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Glasshouse Images/Getty Images

1 In 3 Adults In The U.S. Takes Medications Linked To Depression

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If you're at low risk for heart disease, an electrocardiogram shouldn't be a routine test for you, a panel of medical experts says. Bruno Boissonnet/Science Source hide caption

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Bruno Boissonnet/Science Source

Patchen has been a midwife for twenty years and is the founder of the Teen Alliance for Prepared Parenting or TAPP at Medstar Washington Hospital Center. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

'Where The Need Is': Tackling Teen Pregnancy With A Midwife At School

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CRISPR and other gene technology is exciting, but shouldn't be seen as a panacea for treating illness linked to genetic mutations, says science columnist and author Carl Zimmer. It's still early days for the clinical applications of research. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

A Science Writer Explores The 'Perversions And Potential' Of Genetic Tests

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Microbiologist John Jelesko has learned not to take any chances when he touches poison ivy. Courtesy of John Jelesko hide caption

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Courtesy of John Jelesko

Don't Touch! A Scientist's Advice For Spotting Poison Ivy Before It Ruins Your Summer

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Alyson Hurt/NPR

CDC: U.S. Suicide Rates Have Climbed Dramatically

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