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Chimps use sticks to poke into a mock termite mound to taste a sweet substance placed in the mound by keepers at Chimp Haven in Keithville, La. Today, caretakers say, more chimps in the U.S. live in accredited animal sanctuaries than in research facilities. Janet McConnaughey/AP hide caption

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Janet McConnaughey/AP

Too Frail To Retire? Humans Ponder The Fate Of Research Chimps

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A tinted transmission electron micrograph of Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria (light purple/black) inside a cell. Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S., with more than 1.7 million reported cases in 2017. Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source hide caption

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Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source

Screening for lung cancer can catch tumors but it can also produce false positives. Patients need to decide whether it's right for them, but doctors often don't know how to advise them. FS Productions/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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FS Productions/Getty Images/Blend Images

The authors of a new study on veterinarians and mental health say vet school should include more training on how to cope with the moral distress vets face when asked by pet owners to do things that are against their medical judgment. Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images

President Trump listens in January as Stephen Ubl, president and CEO of Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (second from left), introduces himself during a meeting at the White House. The sky-high prices of some drugs are a big issue for some voters this fall. Pool/Ron Sachs/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Ron Sachs/Getty Images

Should TV Drug Ads Be Forced To Include A Price? Trump's Team Says Yes

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Shared scooters and bicycles are spreading to several major U.S. cities while policymakers are scrambling to find ways to ensure that riders are safe. David Paul Morris/Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Getty Images

As E-Scooters Roll Into American Cities, So Do Safety Concerns

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As Sen. Joe Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia, campaigns for re-election, he has warned that 800,000 West Virginians with pre-existing conditions could lose health coverage. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

As a counselor, Niasha Fray saw firsthand the obstacles black women face in breast cancer treatment. She's now program director of the Duke Center for Community and Population Health Improvement. Justin Cook for NPR hide caption

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Justin Cook for NPR

If you like sudoku, go ahead and play. But staying sharp means using many parts of your brain. Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images hide caption

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images

A Brain Scientist Who Studies Alzheimer's Explains How She Stays Mentally Fit

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Suboxone, a medicine to treat opioid addiction, helps people struggling with substance abuse by blocking their cravings and physical withdrawal symptoms. Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

Addiction Treatment Gap Is Driving A Black Market For Suboxone

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Osteoporosis specialists are considering wider use of a drug to strengthen bones in elderly women. BSIP/BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Wider Use Of Osteoporosis Drug Could Prevent Bone Fractures In More Elderly Women

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Alex Schwartzman, a law student at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., is one of only 8 to 39 percent of college students who get the flu shot in a given year. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Think You Don't Need A Flu Shot? Here Are 5 Reasons To Change Your Mind

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Of parents who tell pollsters their teens have trouble sleeping, 23 percent say the kids are waking up at night worried about their social lives. A third are worried about school. All-night access to electronic devices only aggravates the problem, sleep scientists say. 3photo/Getty Images hide caption

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3photo/Getty Images

Unless you replenish fluids, just an hour's hike in the heat or a 30-minute run might be enough to get mildly dehydrated, scientists say. RunPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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RunPhoto/Getty Images

Off Your Mental Game? You Could Be Mildly Dehydrated

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Sarah Gonzales for NPR

Marines Who Fired Rocket Launchers Now Worry About Their Brains

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Describing how pain affects your daily activities may be more effective than the standard pain scale. Lynn Scurfield for NPR hide caption

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Lynn Scurfield for NPR

Words Matter When Talking About Pain With Your Doctor

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