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Everything Happens for a Reason by Kate Bowler Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

What Not To Say To The Terminally Ill: 'Everything Happens For A Reason'

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On Jan. 10, President Trump signed into law the bipartisan Interdict Act, to give federal agents more tools to curtail opioid trafficking. But, after declaring the opioid crisis a public health emergency last fall, Trump has been slow to request money for treatment, critics note. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Trump Says He Will Focus On Opioid Law Enforcement, Not Treatment

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Brain MRI BSIP/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images

A Tiny Pulse Of Electricity Can Help The Brain Form Lasting Memories

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(From left) Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase; Warren Buffett, CEO of Berkshire Hathaway; and Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon, are creating health care venture, but details are scarce. (From left) Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images; Andy Kropa/Invision/AP; Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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(From left) Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images; Andy Kropa/Invision/AP; Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Patients with a history of polyps who need more subsequent tests may have to pick up some of those costs. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Opponents of abortion rights rallied outside the U.S. Supreme Court during The March for Life on Friday in Washington, D.C. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Doctors in Miami found that a man's tattoo expressing his end-of-life wishes was more confusing than helpful. Gregory Holt/The New England Journal of Medicine hide caption

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Gregory Holt/The New England Journal of Medicine

When A Tattoo Means Life Or Death. Literally

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The Department of Health and Humans Services is adding a Division of Conscience and Religious Freedom to protect doctors, nurses and other health care workers who refuse to take part in some kinds of care because of moral or religious objections. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Trump Admin Will Protect Health Workers Who Refuse Services On Religious Grounds

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Aaron Hernandez (81), of the New England Patriots, lost his helmet during this play against the New York Jets in 2011. Hernandez killed himself in 2017, and researchers found that he had had one of the most severe cases of CTE ever seen in someone his age. Elsa/Getty Images hide caption

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Elsa/Getty Images

Repeated Head Hits, Not Just Concussions, May Lead To A Type Of Chronic Brain Damage

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