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Jared Haley, general manager of the C-Axis plant in Caguas, Puerto Rico, says computer-operated milling machines like this one can cost more than a half-million dollars. Heat and humidity in the plant after Hurricane Maria left many of the machines inoperable, Haley says. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Rico's Medical Manufacturers Worry Federal Tax Plan Could Kill Storm Recovery

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Advertisements paid for by tobacco companies say their products are deadly and were manipulated to be more addictive. Tobacco Free Kids hide caption

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Tobacco Free Kids

In Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More Addictive

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After two weeks of recovery from an addiction to opioids prescribed by her surgeon, Katie Herzog takes a walk with her dog, Pippen. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Should Hospitals Be Punished For Post-Surgical Patients' Opioid Addiction?

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At a press conference in Japan on Monday, President Donald Trump blamed mental illness, not guns, for the Texas massacre. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Texas Shooter's History Raises Questions About Mental Health And Mass Murder

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An overdose rescue kit handed out at an overdose prevention class this summer in New York City includes an injectable form of the drug naloxone. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Counting The Heavy Cost Of Care In The Age Of Opioids

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An 11-year-old boy put small magnets up both nostrils, then couldn't figure out how to get them out. These X-rays tell the tale. The New England Journal of Medicine hide caption

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The New England Journal of Medicine

Kolbi Brown (left), a program manager at Harlem Hospital in New York, helps Karen Phillips sign up to receive more information about the All of Us medical research program, during a block party outside the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR

Troubling History In Medical Research Still Fresh For Black Americans

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Researchers injected dye into this human neuron to reveal its shape. Allen Institute hide caption

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Allen Institute

Scientists And Surgeons Team Up To Create Virtual Human Brain Cells

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Helping her father die at home "was the most meaningful experience in my nursing career," said Rose Crumb. She went on to found Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County in Port Angeles, Wash. Dan DeLong for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Dan DeLong for Kaiser Health News

The teen protagonist in John Green's latest novel, Turtles All The Way Down, has a type of anxiety disorder that sends her into fearful "thought spirals" of bacterial infection and death. Jennifer Kerrigan hide caption

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Jennifer Kerrigan

For Novelist John Green, OCD Is Like An 'Invasive Weed' Inside His Mind

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Dogs may not wash their paws compulsively, but some humans and canines have similar genetic mutations that may influence obsessive behavior. Ute Grabowsky/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Ute Grabowsky/Photothek via Getty Images
MCKIBILLO/Getty Images/Imagezoo

Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State'

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