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Dr. David Burkons holds the licensing certificates that allowed him to open a clinic that provides medical and surgical abortions. It took about 18 extra months of inspections, he says, to get the approval to offer surgical abortions. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

Bucking Trend, Ohio Doctor Opens Clinic That Provides Abortion Services

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Detweiler was surprised to learn she wasn't eating enough to fuel her training regimen. As an athlete, doctors and nutritionists say, she needed more food variety and more calories — three snacks daily, as well as bigger meals. Courtesy of Nationwide Children's Hospital hide caption

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Courtesy of Nationwide Children's Hospital

To Thrive, Many Young Female Athletes Need A Lot More Food

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Eggs may be more vulnerable to freezing than embryos, but that's just one factor that affects the odds of having a baby with frozen eggs. Jean-Paul Chassenet/Science Source hide caption

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Jean-Paul Chassenet/Science Source

Heroin sold in the U.S., like this dose confiscated in Alabama last fall, is often cut with other drugs. Tamika Moore/AL.com/Landov hide caption

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Tamika Moore/AL.com/Landov

Illicit Version Of Painkiller Fentanyl Makes Heroin Deadlier

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University Medical Center New Orleans on Aug. 1, when the $1 billion facility welcomed its first patients. Brett Duke/The Times-Picayune/Landov hide caption

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Brett Duke/The Times-Picayune/Landov

Katrina Shut Down Charity Hospital But Led To More Primary Care

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Frozen sperm straws and embryos are stored in liquid nitrogen, in a process known as cryopreservation. One question confronting the courts: Should embryos such as these be treated as property, or as children subject to custody action? Veronique Burger/Science Source hide caption

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Veronique Burger/Science Source

After A Divorce, What Happens To A Couple's Frozen Embryos?

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A daily pill called Addyi is the first medicine to be approved for the purpose of boosting women's sexual desire. Allen G. Breed/AP hide caption

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Allen G. Breed/AP

FDA Approves First Drug To Boost Women's Sexual Desire

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Can playing the Project Evo game really improve the brain's ability to deal with distractions? Its manufacturer thinks so. Courtesy of Akili hide caption

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Courtesy of Akili

'Play This Video Game And Call Me In The Morning'

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This genetically modified yeast can convert sugar into powerful opioid drugs. Scientists working with the modified yeast strains are required to register them with the Drug Enforcement Administration and keep the yeast under lock and key. Courtesy of Christina Smolke/Stanford University hide caption

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Courtesy of Christina Smolke/Stanford University

Engineers Make Narcotics With Yeast. Is Home-Brewed Heroin Next?

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