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Proponents of medically supervised, indoor sites for opioid injection say such places would be much safer than tent encampments like this one — and could help people addicted to opioids transition into treatment and away from drug use. Natalie Piserchio for WHYY hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for WHYY

Desperate Cities Consider 'Safe Injection' Sites For Opioid Users

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In both urban and rural areas, about 40 percent of women surveyed were currently married to a member of the opposite sex. Only about 30 percent of the rural women of childbearing age had no children, versus roughly 41 percent of urban women. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Up to one half of rural residents are covered by Medicaid, says Michelle Mills, CEO of Colorado Rural Health Center. And they're typically older, poorer and sicker than city dwellers. John Daley/CPR hide caption

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John Daley/CPR

These large capsules, which can be swallowed, measure three different gases as they traverse the gastrointestinal tract. Courtesy of Peter T. Clarke/RMIT University hide caption

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Courtesy of Peter T. Clarke/RMIT University

Dr. Gita Agarwal of Mary's Center conducts a telemedicine conference with Dennis Dolman from his mother's house in Washington, D.C. Tyrone Turner/WAMU hide caption

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Tyrone Turner/WAMU

Can Home Health Visits Help Keep People Out Of The ER?

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Inside the Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic in its earliest days. The clinic opened on June 7, 1967, and treated 250 patients that day. It's motto, then and now: "Health care is a right, not a privilege." Courtesy of Gene Anthony/David Smith Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of Gene Anthony/David Smith Archives

A 1960s 'Hippie Clinic' In San Francisco Inspired A Medical Philosophy

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Careful custody of blood tests and tissue samples is essential to the success of precision medicine. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

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David Silverman/Getty Images

Precision Medical Treatments Have A Quality Control Problem

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With drug prices in the election spotlight, the pharmaceutical industry's main trade group raised its revenue and spending. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Feel In Danger On A Date? These Apps Could Help You Stay Safe

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Earl Borges, now 70, conducted river patrols in the Navy during the Vietnam War. These days, he says, symptoms from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ALS can intensify the anxiety he experiences as a result of PTSD. Courtesy of Shirley Borges hide caption

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Courtesy of Shirley Borges

Reverberations Of War Complicate Vietnam Veterans' End-Of-Life Care

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Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent, joined protesters outside the U.S. Capitol in late November, as Republicans in the Senate worked to pass a sweeping tax bill. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Anna Whiting Sorrell, a member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes in northwest Montana, had hernia surgery a couple of years ago. The Indian Health Service picked up a part of the tab for the surgery but denied coverage for follow-up appointments. Mike Albans for NPR hide caption

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Mike Albans for NPR

Native Americans Feel Invisible In U.S. Health Care System

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