America's Mayors: Governing In Tough Times Outside the Beltway, in cities large and small, mayors are grappling with economic challenges. NPR's series explores how those cities, and their mayors, are coping.

Carlos Gimenez, shown at a cafe earlier this year on Election Day, won a recall election that was part of a national wave of voter anger over taxes. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

In Miami-Dade, Economic Upheaval Ushers In Change

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Wayne Seybold of Marion, Ind., grew up in a trailer park on the factory side of town. As mayor, he's downsized the city's government and expanded the business community. Noah Adams/NPR hide caption

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Progress And Promise For A Town Once In Crisis

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While much of California is struggling financially, the city of Redondo Beach has managed to stay out of the red. The City of Redondo Beach hide caption

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The City of Redondo Beach

Redondo Beach: Unusual Leadership Dodges Red Ink

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Mayor Michael Nutter speaks to members of the media during a visit to Powel Elementary School in June. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

In Tough Times, Philadelphia Bucks The Trend

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Mayor Knox White has led Greenville, S.C., for 15 years, and is running unopposed for another term. Here, he stands near a natural waterfall that's in the middle of the city's downtown, in a park that cost $13 million. "Within two years," he says, "over $100 million in private investment was created around the park." Julie Rose/WFAE hide caption

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Julie Rose/WFAE

How A Park Helped One Town Weather The Recession

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Rahm Emanuel celebrated with supporters at the Journeymen Plumbers' Union Local 130 Hall after winning the mayoral election in February. Now, Emanuel is in a test of wills with unions over closing the city's massive budget gap. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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In Chicago, A Test Of Wills Over A Budget Deficit

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