Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz Each week, NPR's award-winning program showcases both acclaimed artists and up-and-coming performers as they share music and memories.
Special Series

Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz

Acclaimed jazz artists share music and memories

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Kenny Barron On Piano Jazz

The pianist performs "Clouds" and pairs with host Marian McPartland for "How Deep Is The Ocean?" in 2003.

Listen: Kenny Barron On Piano Jazz

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Of Marian McPartland's "Twilight World," the great singer Tony Bennett once said, "Well, that song will last forever. It's a beautiful song." David Redfern/Redferns hide caption

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Twilight World: Remembering Marian McPartland

The pianist and composer valued sophisticated harmonies, aching melodies and a tremendous emotional range. Here, we feature her original compositions and musical collaborations with Sarah Vaughan, Karrin Allison, Thad Jones, Elvis Costello and more.

Listen: Marian McPartland's Songs

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Marian McPartland, Jazz Pianist And NPR Host, Has Died

As the host of a weekly public radio program pairing conversation and duet performances, McPartland brought many jazz greats to an audience of millions. For more than 40 years, she offered an intimate perspective on the elusive topic of improvisation.

Marian McPartland, 'Piano Jazz' Host, Has Died

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Jimmy Heath On Piano Jazz

Heath joins host Marian McPartland and bassist Rufus Reid for an hour of unforgettable talk and music, including "You've Changed" and Heath's most famous tune, "Gingerbread Boy."

Listen: Jimmy Heath On Piano Jazz

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Boz Scaggs On Piano Jazz

The singer-songwriter and guitarist plays a couple of Gershwin tunes with host Marian McPartland.

Listen: Boz Scaggs On Piano Jazz

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Dick Hyman On Piano Jazz

Piano Jazz celebrates its 30th anniversary with a return visit from pianist, composer and arranger Dick Hyman, who appeared on the show during its first season in 1979. Always the fleet-fingered pianist and versatile musician, Hyman performs Gershwin, Jobim and a James P. Johnson rag before winding up the hour playing an improvised blues tune with host Marian McPartland.

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John Bunch On Piano Jazz

Bunch learned to arrange for big bands while held captive in a German POW camp during WWII. After returning stateside, he worked with the likes of Woody Herman, Gene Krupa and Benny Goodman, and was Tony Bennett's pianist for a number of years. Bunch died earlier this year, so Piano Jazz remembers him with this 1991 session.

Ron Carter plays Miles Davis' iconic "So What" at a tempo somewhere between the Kind of Blue original and the breakneck pace set by the 1960s quintet. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Ron Carter On Piano Jazz

Ron Carter has set the standard for modern jazz bass players. He rose to fame with Miles Davis, but went on to play with Stan Getz and Thelonious Monk. His recording work spans 2,000 albums, and he's had equally successful careers as a bandleader, composer and educator. Hear the bassist in a session on Piano Jazz.

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Tony DeSare On Piano Jazz

In this 2008 episode, the vocalist and pianist covers Frank Sinatra, accompanies Marian McPartland and performs an original song.

Tony DeSare On Piano Jazz

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Janis Siegel On Piano Jazz

Siegel, a singer, is one quarter of the jazz supergroup The Manhattan Transfer. Throughout the 30 years she's spent with that musical institution, she's also released her own recordings featuring hip, seductive arrangements of standards, as well as newer works. Here, she visits Piano Jazz along with pianist and accordion player Gil Goldstein.

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Clare Fischer On Piano Jazz

Hear the late bandleader bring his deft touch to a set of Billy Strayhorn classics and more.

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Bela Fleck On Piano Jazz

Fleck joins host Marian McPartland and bassist Gary Mazzaroppi for trio renditions of "In Walked Bud," "All the Things You Are" and "Polka Dots and Moonbeams."

Listen: Bela Fleck On Piano Jazz

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Barbara Carroll On Piano Jazz

Pianist and singer Barbara Carroll was host Marian McPartland's second guest during the first season of Piano Jazz. Thirty years later, Carroll makes a return appearance to reminisce with her friend about their experiences at the Hickory House and the Oak Room. Carroll gives a charming performance of "Very Early" and McPartland improvises a musical portrait of her guest.

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Grady Tate On Piano Jazz

Grady Tate began his jazz career as a much-celebrated drummer, backing such icons as Wes Montgomery, Ella Fitzgerald, and Quincy Jones. Tate has since traded in his skins for a microphone at center stage, where he delivers smooth and soulful baritone vocals. With pianist John di Martino, Tate sings "Everybody Loves My Baby" and "Where Do You Start."

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Jane Monheit On Piano Jazz

Marian McPartland accompanies the vocalist on music from the Gershwins, Duke Ellington and more.

Listen Now: Jane Monheit On Piano Jazz

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