Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond The Northeast region recovers from the massive storm, which blew through coastal regions late Oct. 29, killed more than 100 people, and destroyed homes and businesses.
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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond

The Northeast region recovers from the massive storm which killed more than 100 people.

Daniel Riscoe, Jenna Hart, Anthony Chau and Caroline Lloyd (all students from the Peddie School in Hightstown, N.J.) carry donated Christmas trees across Island Beach. Adam Cole/NPR hide caption

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Adam Cole/NPR

After Sandy, Not All Sand Dunes Are Created Equal

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Torahs are draped on chairs and tables at Temple Israel of Long Beach, N.Y. The synagogue was flooded during Superstorm Sandy, but hasn't received federal aid. Temple Israel hide caption

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Temple Israel

Highly detailed sonar systems aboard the research vessel Pritchard gave researchers a clear view of the sediment on the seafloor off Long Island. Courtesy of John Goff/University Of Texas hide caption

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Courtesy of John Goff/University Of Texas

Sand After Sandy: Scientists Map Seafloor For Sediment

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People walk past a closed business affected by Hurricane Sandy in the heavily damaged South Street Seaport in New York City in December. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Much of the money from the Hurricane Sandy relief bill the House of Representatives passed will fund beach and infrastructure restoration projects in areas such as Mantoloking, N.J., seen on Oct. 31. Doug Mills/AP hide caption

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Doug Mills/AP

House Approves Sandy Aid, Senate Votes Next

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Deborah Rassi, 59, cleans her new kitchen. She's holding a bag of donated clothing, one of many that volunteers left in the new mobile home. Neena Satija/WNPR hide caption

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Neena Satija/WNPR

Superstorm Sandy Victims Resettle, Thanks To Small Town's Efforts

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A woman walks past a cabana complex pulled off its foundations by Superstorm Sandy in Sea Bright, N.J., in November. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Areas Rebuilding After Sandy Seeking More Aid From Washington

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Natisha Laws near her hotel in the middle of Times Square. She and her family were placed at the DoubleTree in mid-November by FEMA. They lost their rental apartment during Superstorm Sandy and have been struggling to recover. Cindy Rodriguez for NPR hide caption

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Cindy Rodriguez for NPR

Storm Refugees Struggle To Rebound In Times Square

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Each FEMA-registered family with kids can pick out toys at the volunteer-run Staten Island store. Margot Adler/NPR hide caption

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Margot Adler/NPR

The Statue of Liberty survived Sandy unscathed, but Liberty Island remains closed indefinitely as workers remove mud and debris. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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Joel Rose/NPR

Lady Liberty's Sea-Washed Gates Closed Indefinitely

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A woman with the Army Corps of Engineers documents a destroyed home last month in a residential area of New Dorp Beach on Staten Island in New York City. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

New York Planners Prep For A 'New Normal' Of Powerful Storms

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Superstorm Sandy caused massive beach erosion and damage to the Jersey shore. Some people say the beach restoration work, which will largely be paid for with federal tax dollars, will mostly help to protect expensive homes for the wealthy — people who have free access to the beach — while most communities would still be charging fees for public access. Doug Mills/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/AFP/Getty Images

Jenny Adams in the Wayland Bar in Alphabet City, where she stored piles of relief supplies to distribute. Adams raised $10,000 through a crowdfunding website to help her neighbors affected by Hurricane Sandy. Alex Goldmark/NPR hide caption

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Alex Goldmark/NPR

Abandoned and flooded cars sit in the Rockaway neighborhood of Queens, N.Y., on Nov. 2. It's estimated that it could cost auto insurers $800 million to deal with all the claims from the storm. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Next Post-Sandy Challenge: The Sea Of Damaged Cars

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Joseph Leader, chief maintenance officer of the New York City subway system, surveys damage caused by Superstorm Sandy, this week at the South Ferry station. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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Joel Rose/NPR

Atlantic City's boardwalk, with its shops, restaurants, casinos and hotels, was mostly protected during Hurricane Sandy by a dune restoration project. But TV images of one small section that was damaged gave the impression that the whole thing was destroyed. David Schaper/NPR hide caption

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David Schaper/NPR

Post-Sandy: Atlantic City Wants Its Tourists Back

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Cleanup continues on the site of a demolished home on the Rockaway Peninsula in New York on Nov. 29. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

White House To Seek Emergency Sandy Funds

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