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The Salt Featured Two

Worshipful female followers fought for the Mad Monk's leftover bread crusts. His infamous sweet tooth led to his death. Or did it? A century later, rumors about Grigori Rasputin, Russia's czarina whisperer, still swirl. RGALI/Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux hide caption

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RGALI/Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Vishwesh Bhatt is the executive chef of Snackbar, a restaurant in Oxford, Miss. And he's winning acclaim as one of the region's best chefs for Indian-inflected Southern fare that reflects a changing South. Danny Klimetz for NPR hide caption

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Danny Klimetz for NPR

Mississippi Masala: How A Native Of India Became A Southern Cooking Star

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Volunteers serve free dinner to homeless people at Robin Hood restaurant in Madrid. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

Spain's 'Robin Hood Restaurant' Charges The Rich And Feeds The Poor

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Helen Dahlke, a scientist from the University of California, Davis, stands in an almond orchard outside Modesto that's being deliberately flooded. This experiment is examining how flooding farmland in the winter can help replenish the state's depleted aquifers. Joe Proudman/Joe Proudman / Courtesy of UC Davis hide caption

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Joe Proudman/Joe Proudman / Courtesy of UC Davis

As Rains Soak California, Farmers Test How To Store Water Underground

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This shark may look menacing, but sautee it and drizzle some lemon caper sauce on top, and this dogfish becomes doggone delicious. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Ben de la Cruz/NPR

Would You Eat This Fish? A Shark Called Dogfish Makes A Tasty Taco

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Which eating plan will work with your lifestyle and help you lose weight? U.S.News & World Report has plenty of advice with its latest diet rankings. Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images hide caption

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Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images
Dan Charles/NPR

By Returning To Farming's Roots, He Found His American Dream

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African runner peanuts were once a defining flavor of the South, memorialized in songs, peanut fritters, peanut soup and in Charleston's signature candy, the peanut-and-molasses groundnut cake. But by the 1930s the nuts had all but disappeared. Courtesy of Brian Ward hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Ward

Moe stands behind her tiny bar in Shanghai, where there are only eight seats and reservations are a must. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

In A Massive City, This Bar Serves Up Diverse Drinks — To 8 People At A Time

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In the 1970s, Mr. Coffee became iconic, an American byword for drip brewing. By Christmas 1977, department stores were selling more than 40,000 Mr. Coffees a day. Credit for some of that success goes to the machine's longtime pitchman, former New York Yankee Joltin' Joe DiMaggio, seen here in a television commercial from 1978. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

The 18th century French botanist Louis Lémery wrote that asparagus causes "a filthy and disagreeable smell in the urine, as everybody knows." Not everybody, Louis. Not everybody. Getty Images/imageBROKER RF hide caption

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Getty Images/imageBROKER RF