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The Salt Featured Two

You probably wouldn't want to eat these Jack O'Lanterns since they've been carved and sitting out. But this variety of pumpkin is perfectly edible and nutritious. Wildcat Dunny/Flickr hide caption

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Wildcat Dunny/Flickr

Chefs Kerry Heffernan and Tom Colicchio pose for a photo at Bearnaise, a Capitol Hill restaurant, on Tuesday before setting out for a day of lobbying lawmakers. Kris Connor/Getty Images hide caption

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Kris Connor/Getty Images

Evelyn Birkby interviews guests on her KMA radio program, Down a Country Lane, in 1951 in Shenandoah, Iowa. Courtesy of University of Iowa Women's Archives/Evelyn Birkby Collection hide caption

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Courtesy of University of Iowa Women's Archives/Evelyn Birkby Collection

While schools are spending more on local food, it still makes up only a small portion of the average school meal. Here, a chicken salad at the cafeteria at Draper Middle School in Rotterdam, N.Y., in 2012. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

As Schools Buy More Local Food, Kids Throw Less Food In The Trash

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A macaque picks coconuts from a treetop on Thailand's Samui Island. Captive monkeys are trained to help harvest coconuts on the island's plantations. Christophe Boisvieux/Corbis hide caption

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Christophe Boisvieux/Corbis

In the historic kitchen of Monticello, using period utensils, food historian Paula Marcoux recreates 18th-century French dishes as James Hemings would have made them. Hemings — who spent five years with Thomas Jefferson in France — had a mastery of French cooking far beyond what was found in most American households of the era. Katie Manning for NPR hide caption

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Katie Manning for NPR

Behind The Founding Foodie, A French-Trained Chef Bound By Slavery

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Andris Roder (left) and Adam Finding, cooks at the Kisuzem restaurant in Budapest, prepare a traditional Eritrean meal of injera bread, chickpea paste and meat stew. Their restaurant served up Eritrean food all week for a food festival in solidarity with migrants and refugees streaming into Hungary. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

Budapest Foodies Hope Cuisine Can Help Heal Anti-Migrant Prejudice

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Wing Gourds: According to Phil Rupp, president of Rupp Seeds, many years ago an Amish woman from Pennsylvania sent Phil's father, Roger Rupp, then head of the company, photos of an interesting gourd she'd developed. Roger hadn't seen anything like them, so he agreed to market them. The woman sent in some seeds, and from there Rupp's popular line of wing gourds was born. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Good Gourd! What's With All The Weird-Looking Squash?

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Acclaimed French chef Jacques Pepin (center) has had an extraordinary 60-year career. He says his new cookbook, Jacques Pepin: Heart and Soul in the Kitchen, will be his last. Maybe. Evan Agostini/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/AP

What Would Julia Child Do? Jacques Pépin Says: Add More Butter

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About 50 percent of the vegetables available today are tomatoes and potatoes, according to new USDA data. Lettuce is the third most available single vegetable. Legumes and all other vegetables make up 41 percent of what's available. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

The federal food stamps program is working to make sure low-income Americans are getting enough calories, but those calories are less nutritious than what everyone else eats, research finds. The USDA is funding programs to try to bridge that gap, such as initiatives that allow food stamp recipients to use their benefits at farmers markets. Allen Breed/AP hide caption

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Allen Breed/AP

"Probably females are better at accessing olfactory memories, but I don't know why," says Robert Bath, a wine and beverage studies professor at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley. "Maybe men don't pay as much attention?" Maria Fabrizio for NPR hide caption

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR