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The Mexican long-tongued bat is one of the species that pollinates agave, but its ecosystem is being disrupted by large-scale, cheaper methods of making tequila. Merlin Tuttle/Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation hide caption

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Merlin Tuttle/Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation

Bats And Tequila: A Once Boo-tiful Relationship Cursed By Growing Demands

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In the last 13 years of Queen Victoria's life, she spent a great deal of time with Abdul Karim, who came from India initially to wait on the queen's table, but soon became part of her inner circle. And despite all opposition, Victoria and Karim curried on. Alexander Bassano/Spencer Arnold/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Bassano/Spencer Arnold/Getty Images

Bob Scott, a weed scientist at the University of Arkansas, says he wishes more testing could have been done on the new dicamba formulations, but "the product was not made available to us." Dan Charles/ NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/ NPR

Monsanto Attacks Scientists After Studies Show Trouble For Weedkiller Dicamba

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Food allergies are tricky to diagnose, and many kids can outgrow them, too. A test called an oral food challenge is the gold standard to rule out an allergy. It's performed under medical supervision. Michelle Kondrich for NPR hide caption

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

This Test Can Determine Whether You've Outgrown A Food Allergy

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United Farm Workers leader Dolores Huerta at the Delano grape workers strike in Delano, Calif., 1966. The strike set in motion the modern farmworkers movement. Jon Lewis/Courtesy of LeRoy Chatfield hide caption

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Jon Lewis/Courtesy of LeRoy Chatfield

For the first time, scientists have carefully analyzed all the critters in a kitchen sponge. There turns out to be a huge number. Despite recent news reports, there is something you can do about it. Joy Ho for NPR hide caption

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Joy Ho for NPR

So Your Kitchen Sponge Is A Bacteria Hotbed. Here's What To Do

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In the 1950s, the poultry industry began dunking birds in antibiotic baths. It was supposed to keep meat fresher and healthier. That's not what happened, as Maryn McKenna recounts in her new book. Express/Getty Images hide caption

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Express/Getty Images

Hamilton-inspired cupcake toppers. It was only a matter of time before fans of the Broadway hit sought out culinary tributes to their most treasured folk hero. Courtesy of Alexis Murphy hide caption

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Courtesy of Alexis Murphy

Berlin, Germany: A candid photograph of Eva Braun with Adolf Hitler at the dining table. A new book explores the lives of six women through food, and Hitler's mistress is a startling inclusion. But what Braun ate reflected a "perpetual enactment of her own daydream" against a barbaric backdrop. Bettmann/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann/Getty Images

A group of men with full glasses proudly pose with their keg of beer in San Francisco, 1895. Underwood Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Underwood Archives/Getty Images

How The Story Of Beer Is The Story Of America

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Patrick McGovern, scientific director of the Biomolecular Archaeology Project at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, delves into the early history of fermentation in his latest book. Courtesy of Alison Dunlap hide caption

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Courtesy of Alison Dunlap