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John Umland (left) and John Torrens gather donated cans of food in 2011 in Rohnert Park, Calif., for the group Neighbors Organized Against Hunger. Hunger advocates say a lot of nutritionally dense food like canned tuna and beans can be cheaper than processed food. Kent Porter/ZUMA Press/Corbis hide caption

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Kent Porter/ZUMA Press/Corbis

One of America's favorite bites: the hotdog. Here, a man and women enjoy the dogs at a California fair in 1905. Courtesy of Sourcebooks hide caption

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Courtesy of Sourcebooks

A Journey Through The History Of American Food In 100 Bites

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California sheep rancher Dan Macon had to sell almost half of his herd because the drought left him without enough feed. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

With Drought The New Normal, Calif. Farmers Find They Have To Change

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Global food giant Unilever, which owns the ubiquitous Hellmann's brand, is suing Hampton Creek, the maker of Just Mayo, an egg-free spread made from peas, sorghum and other plants. Richard Levine/Corbis; Courtesy of Hampton Creek hide caption

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Richard Levine/Corbis; Courtesy of Hampton Creek

Big Mayo Vs. Little Mayo: Which Brand Has Egg On Its Face?

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Slow-cooked New York bear meat has been described as like beef stew, but with "a little stronger texture and a little gamier flavor." David Sommerstein /North Country Public Radio hide caption

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David Sommerstein /North Country Public Radio

These wooden tokens are handed out to shoppers who use SNAP benefits to purchase fresh produce at the Crossroads Farmers Market near Takoma Park, Md. Customers receive tokens worth twice the amount of money withdrawn from their SNAP benefits card — in other words, they get "double bucks." Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

How 'Double Bucks' For Food Stamps Conquered Capitol Hill

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Edgar Meadows has been growing Bloody Butcher corn, an heirloom variety, for generations. The name Bloody Butcher refers to the flecks of red mixed onto the white kernels, like a butcher's apron, Meadows says. Roxy Todd/West Viginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Roxy Todd/West Viginia Public Broadcasting

Dr. Curtis Chan, a dentist in Del Mar, Calif., loads up a truck with 5,456 pounds of candy to deliver to Operation Gratitude during the Halloween Candy Buyback on Nov. 8 last year. Chan personally collected 3,542 pounds of candy from patients. Courtesy of Curtis Chan hide caption

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Courtesy of Curtis Chan

Cash For Halloween Candy? Dentists' Buyback Program Is Booming

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After a hard day of bruising battle, ancient gladiators reached for a post-workout drink, according to an ancient account. New research backs that up. Stefano Bianchetti/Corbis hide caption

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Stefano Bianchetti/Corbis