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Mama Stamberg's cranberry relish recipe. Ariel Zambelich & Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich & Emily Bogle/NPR

Cranberry Relish: The NPR Recipe That Divides Thanksgiving Tables

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People who are sensitive to the bitterness of caffeine tend to drink more coffee than others, while people sensitive to bitter flavors like quinine drink less coffee, according to a new study. Dimitri Otis/Getty Images hide caption

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Dimitri Otis/Getty Images

Microplastics are not just showing up on beaches like this one in the Canary Islands — a very small study shows that they are in human waste in many parts of the world. Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images

The barley used to make beer as we know it may take a hit under climate change, but growers say they are already preparing by planting it farther north in colder locations. Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images

San Diego high school students await a bus ride to Blythe, Calif., to go pick cantaloupes in the summer of 1965. They were recruited as part of the A-TEAM, a government program to replace migrant farm workers with high school students. Courtesy of the San Diego Union-Tribune hide caption

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Courtesy of the San Diego Union-Tribune

The vines at Pheasant Ridge Winery near Lubbock, Texas, were devastated by drift from the herbicide 2,4-D in 2016. Merrit Kennedy/NPR hide caption

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Merrit Kennedy/NPR

West Texas Vineyards Blasted By Herbicide Drift From Nearby Cotton Fields

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Microplastics found along Lake Ontario by Rochman's team Chris Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Chris Joyce/NPR

Beer, Drinking Water And Fish: Tiny Plastic Is Everywhere

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The latest study to link coffee and longevity adds to a growing body of evidence that, far from a vice, the brew can be protective of good health. Sutthiwat Srikhrueadam / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Sutthiwat Srikhrueadam / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Coffee Drinkers Are More Likely To Live Longer. Decaf May Do The Trick, Too

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Abner Stolztfus owns Cedar Dream dairy farm in Peach Bottom, Pa. Last year, Stolztfus decided to invest almost $200,000 in equipment and learned how to make yogurt from scratch. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Rinsing your produce is a good idea, but it won't give you 100 percent protection from bacteria that cause foodborne illness unless you cook it thoroughly. Because we eat lettuce raw, a lot of people got sick in a recent outbreak. StockFood/Getty Images/Foodcollection hide caption

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StockFood/Getty Images/Foodcollection
Fabio Consoli for NPR

Want Your Child To Eat (Almost) Everything? There Is A Way

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In the division of household tasks, one study shows that washing dishes is the category with the biggest discrepancy between men and women. Alex Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wilson/Getty Images