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The Salt Featured Two

Michele Vaccaro buries a fig tree in the yard of Mary Menniti in Sewickley, Pa. Hal Klein for NPR hide caption

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Hal Klein for NPR

Why Bury Fig Trees? A Curious Tradition Preserves A Taste Of Italy

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Cows rotate in the milking parlor at Fair Oaks Farms, a large-scale dairy and tourist attraction, near Rensselaer, Ind. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Inside The Indiana Megadairy Making Coca-Cola's New Milk

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The rellenong manok at La Cocina de Tita Moning, a restaurant in Manila. Chef Suzette Montinola uses a traditional recipe from the 1930s that belonged to her grandmother. Aurora Almendral for NPR hide caption

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Aurora Almendral for NPR

A woman prepares a Japanese Christmas cake at the Patisserie Akira Cake shop on Dec. 23, 2011. The sponge cake is drenched in symbolic meaning. Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images hide caption

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Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images

Wrapped in gold and silver foil, chocolate gelt are often handed out as a little treat for children (and adults) during Hanukkah. Turns out, the tradition is rooted in real money. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Hanukkah History: Those Chocolate Coins Were Once Real Tips

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A crab pot full of snow crabs, fished out of the Bering Sea. Josh Thomas /Courtesy of WWF hide caption

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Josh Thomas /Courtesy of WWF

Why The White House Wants To Go After Seafood Pirates

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Chris Lohring founded Notch Brewing in 2010. The company's lineup includes a Czech pilsner, a Belgian saison and an India pale ale. All of the brews are session beers — meaning their alcohol by volume, or A.B.V., is less than 5 percent. Courtesy of Notch Brewing hide caption

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Courtesy of Notch Brewing

More Drinking, Less Buzz: Session Beers Gain Fans

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When it comes to salty french fries or pizza served at lunch, schools may get more time to dial back sodium content, thanks to a provision in the federal spending bill headed for a vote on Capitol Hill. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Mattheos Koffas (left), a biochemical engineer at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and Andrew Jones, a graduate student in his lab, with a flask of microbe-produced antioxidants. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Who Made That Flavor? Maybe A Genetically Altered Microbe

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Rotten, fermented fruit has some nutritional value, and may have looked pretty good to our hungry ancient ancestors. Evolving the ability to metabolize the alcohol in fermented fruit may have helped us adapt to a changing climate 10 million years ago, research suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Samples of carrots cooked three ways are placed on a table for the kids at Walker-Jones Educational Campus, in Washington, D.C., to sample after they have finished lunch. The crowd favorite will later end up on the school lunch menu. Claire Eggers/NPR hide caption

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Claire Eggers/NPR

Of Carrots And Kids: Healthy School Lunches That Don't Get Tossed

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