The Salt Featured Two The Salt featured two
Special Series

The Salt Featured Two

From field to bakery, a loaf of bread packs a measurable environmental punch. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

What's The Environmental Footprint Of A Loaf Of Bread? Now We Know

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/517531611/517563261" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An illustration from 1875 depicts the survivors of the frigate Cospatrick, which caught fire off South Africa's Cape of Good Hope in November 1874. Of more than 470 people on board, just three ultimately survived, and they were reduced to cannibalism. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Many of the Japanese Americans incarcerated at Tule Lake had been farmers before the war. At camp, they were employed as field workers, often for $12 a month. Here, incarcerees work in a carrot field. Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project via The National Archives hide caption

toggle caption
Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project via The National Archives

Freda DeKnight was Ebony's first food editor and author of a best-selling African-American cookbook in the 1940s. Her recipes presented a vision of black America that was often invisible in mainstream media. Sierra Nicole Rhoden/Chicago Tribune hide caption

toggle caption
Sierra Nicole Rhoden/Chicago Tribune

"Sell by" and "expiration" labels on food products may contribute to food waste by misleading consumers to throwing away perfectly good food. Now, two food industry associations are encouraging food companies to do away with these labels. Ryan Eskalis/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Eskalis/NPR

American writer, abolitionist and orator Frederick Douglass edits a journal at his desk, late 1870s. Douglass was acutely conscious of being a literary witness to the inhumane institution of slavery he had escaped as a young man. He made sure to document his life in not one but three autobiographies. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site in Collinsville, Ill. A thriving American Indian city that rose to prominence after A.D. 900 owing to successful maize farming, it may have collapsed because of changing climate. Michael Dolan/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Dolan/Flickr

Green tips of of a newly developed grain called Salish Blue are poking through older, dead stalks in Washington's Skagit Valley. Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix hide caption

toggle caption
Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix

A still from Budweiser's Super Bowl ad tells the story of one of Budweiser's founders. Budweiser via YouTube/ Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Budweiser via YouTube/ Screenshot by NPR

Worshipful female followers fought for the Mad Monk's leftover bread crusts. His infamous sweet tooth led to his death. Or did it? A century later, rumors about Grigori Rasputin, Russia's czarina whisperer, still swirl. RGALI/Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux hide caption

toggle caption
RGALI/Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux