The Salt Featured Two The Salt featured two

The Salt Featured Two

This bag contains about as much caffeine as a thousand cups of coffee. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Morgan McCloy/NPR

Caffeine For Sale: The Hidden Trade Of The World's Favorite Stimulant

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467844829/468216212" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A tea lady brings round refreshments for British office workers in the 1970s. All over the U.K., the arrival of the tea ladies with trolleys loaded with a steaming tea urn and a tray of cakes or buns was the high point of the workday. M. Fresco/Evening Standard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
M. Fresco/Evening Standard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Chefs at work in the kitchen of a restaurant in New York's Chinatown, circa 1940. For many Chinese, opening up restaurants became a way to bypass U.S. immigration laws designed to keep them out of the country. Weegee(Arthur Fellig)/International Center of Photography/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Weegee(Arthur Fellig)/International Center of Photography/Getty Images

An assortment of organic vegetables are seen on display. A growing body of evidence documents how farming methods can influence the nutritional content of foods. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Polish nuns do most of the cooking at the Vatican. Here, they prepare sweets for the Feast of St. Nicholas. Katarzyna Artymiak/Courtesy of Sophia Institute Press hide caption

toggle caption
Katarzyna Artymiak/Courtesy of Sophia Institute Press

A scene from the TV show Leave It to Beaver. The 1950s emphasized the importance of a happy nuclear family — and in popular media, the dining table often became a place to showcase these idealized dynamics. ABC Photo Archives/ABC via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ABC Photo Archives/ABC via Getty Images

A Chipotle restaurant at Union Station in Washington, D.C. The company's food-safety troubles have provoked quite a bit of schadenfreude in the rest of the food industry. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gene J. Puskar/AP

Chipotle's Food-Safety Woes? Don't Expect Sympathy From Rest Of Industry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/466545600/466648939" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bottles for sale at Passage de la Fleur, a natural wine shop in Brooklyn, N.Y. For some, natural wines must be completely unadulterated — without the use of sugar, clarifiers or other additives common in modern winemaking. Other natural winemakers, however, will use a little sulfur dioxide or added yeast to correct problems, according to Stephen Meuse, a wine buyer in Massachusetts. Andrea Shea for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Andrea Shea for NPR

Object (or Luncheon in Fur), by Meret Oppenheim. In 1936, Oppenheim wrapped a teacup, saucer and spoon in fur. In the age of Freud, a gastro-sexual interpretation was inescapable. Even today, the work triggers intense reactions. Flavia Brandi/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Flavia Brandi/Flickr

Sushi burritos from Washington, D.C., restaurant Buredo. These are delicious, but there's no way they'll earn certification as authentic Japanese cuisine under a new program from the government of Japan. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Morgan McCloy/NPR

Sales for the Keurig, an individual coffee brewer, are down about $60 million from last year. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kathy Willens/AP

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/465803034/465819183" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In 1747, members of the notorious Hawkhurst Gang carried out a brazen midnight raid on the King's Custom House in Poole, England: They broke in and stole back their impounded tea. What followed over the next weeks would shock even hardened criminals. E. Keble Chatterton - King's Cutters and Smugglers 1700-1855/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

toggle caption
E. Keble Chatterton - King's Cutters and Smugglers 1700-1855/Wikimedia Commons