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A Bolivian farmer harvests organic quinoa in his fields in Puerto Perez, Bolivia. Some researchers are working with quinoa farmers in Bolivia and Peru to try to develop internal markets for threatened varieties — for example, in hospital and school food programs. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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Juan Karita/AP

These shrimp "Peking ravioli" (aka dumplings) were featured at the third annual Festival of Dumplings in 2014 — honoring Bostonian and celebrity chef Joyce Chen. Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

The modern broiler, or meat chicken, grows incredibly fast. But some critics say the bird — and the flavor of its meat — may suffer as a result. Whole Foods wants all of its suppliers to shift to slower-growing chicken breeds, like this one, seen at Arkansas-based Crystal Lake Farms. Courtesy of Crystal Lake Farms hide caption

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Courtesy of Crystal Lake Farms

Why Whole Foods Wants A Slower-Growing Chicken

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A beehive at Frangiosa Farms, in Parker, Colo. The farm introduced an adopt-a-hive program in 2012. The one-time adoption fees per hive range from $45 to $130 (the latter gets you three jars of honey). Courtesy of Nick French/Frangiosa Farms hide caption

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Courtesy of Nick French/Frangiosa Farms

A batch of sourdough starter can live indefinitely, but it also requires a certain amount of care and feeding. In Sweden, bakers jetting off for vacation can leave their precious starters in the care of a sitter at the airport. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Boba 7, the speakeasy at the back of downtown Los Angeles restaurant Soi 7, serves boba cocktails made with beer or the Korean alcohol soju, in addition to an inventive nonalcoholic menu. Courtesy of Boba 7 hide caption

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Courtesy of Boba 7

Rick Bayless is a master of Mexican cuisine. He's also a white guy from Oklahoma. Over the years, that has made him the target of criticism. Who gets to be the ambassador of a cuisine? Sergi Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergi Alexander/Getty Images

Left: Julia Ward Howe, pictured during her honeymoon in England. Right: Her husband, Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe. He would soon prove controlling of every aspect of her life, including what she ate. The Yellow House Papers: The Laura E. Richards Collection, Gardiner Library Association and Maine Historical Society, Coll. 2085, RG10, F6; Samuel Gridley Howe, 1857. Courtesy of Perkins School for the Blind Archives. hide caption

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The Yellow House Papers: The Laura E. Richards Collection, Gardiner Library Association and Maine Historical Society, Coll. 2085, RG10, F6; Samuel Gridley Howe, 1857. Courtesy of Perkins School for the Blind Archives.

Albert Einstein, Steve Jobs, Isaac Newton, Gandhi, Pythagoras, Balzac, Marie Curie — scanning history's greatest minds, we find many were inspired by certain food or drink, repulsed by others, or had some very peculiar dining habits. Katherine Du/NPR hide caption

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Katherine Du/NPR
Katherine Du/NPR

Chew On This: Slicing Meat Helped Shape Modern Humans

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Less-than-perfect fruit and vegetables are sold at a discount under the new Produce with Personality program being piloted at five Giant Eagle stores in Pittsburgh. Courtesy of Giant Eagle hide caption

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Courtesy of Giant Eagle