The Salt Featured Two The Salt featured two

In 1957, Duncan Hines and his wife, Clara, cut a cake at the Duncan Hines test kitchen in Ithaca, N.Y. Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU hide caption

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Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU

Atole de elote is a warm corn drink from Central America. Student Jose Rivas wrote an essay about a weekly tradition of enjoying atole with his late father in El Salvador, and how the drink helped him to feel more at home after he moved to the U.S. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

Anyone who has read or seen Victor Hugo's masterpiece knows the plot of Les Miserables turns on the theft of a simple loaf of bread. There was no sharper barometer of economic status in 19th-century France than bread. Minnie Phan for NPR hide caption

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Minnie Phan for NPR

As they travel the parade route, tuxedoed men and youths distribute strings of colorful beads, dried fava beans and genuine Italian kisses. Courtesy of The Italian American St. Joseph Society hide caption

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Courtesy of The Italian American St. Joseph Society

In an image from the first Foxfire book, students in 1969 look on as Hobe Beasley, John Hopper and Hopper's wife suspend a hog for finishing the work of scalding and scraping. Courtesy of The Foxfire Fund, Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of The Foxfire Fund, Inc.

Miners favored the pasty due to its portable nature — a small meat pie that could easily be carried into the mines for 12-hour workdays. Matt Cardy/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Cardy/Getty Images

La Belle Limonadiere, hand coloured etching (1816). Lemonade was ubiquitous in mid-17th century Paris. Where the limonadiers went, piles of spent lemon peels followed. As rats nibbled on the peels, they killed off plague-infected fleas, Tom Nealon argues in his new book. Courtesy of The British Library Board/The Overlook Press hide caption

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Courtesy of The British Library Board/The Overlook Press

Getting kids to eat veggies through subterfuge — say, by sneaking spinach into smoothies -- sets the bar too low, researchers say. Your child must actually learn to like veggies, weird textures and all. Alex Reynolds/NPR hide caption

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Alex Reynolds/NPR

Eating too much bacon, or too few whole grains, nuts and seeds, can influence your risk of death from heart disease. Nearly half of all deaths from heart disease and Type 2 diabetes are linked to diet. Paul Taylor/Getty Images, John Lawson/Belhaven/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Taylor/Getty Images, John Lawson/Belhaven/Getty Images

Philippe Mora, whose father made life-saving baguettes during WWII, displays his graphic of his father, Georges Mora, and his godfather, Marcel Marceau, making mayonnaise together. Courtesy of NOISE Film PR hide caption

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Courtesy of NOISE Film PR

A new study of the dental plaques of three Neanderthals reveals surprising facts about their lives, including what they ate, the diseases that ailed them and how they self-medicated (and smooched). (Above) An illustration of Neanderthals in Spain shows them preparing to eat plants and mushrooms. Courtesy of Abel Grau/Comunicación CSIC hide caption

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Courtesy of Abel Grau/Comunicación CSIC

Some Neanderthals Were Vegetarian — And They Likely Kissed Our Human Ancestors

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As more research suggests some degree of dietary cholesterol is harmless, if not healthy, the egg's reputation is slowly returning. Yet some experts worry the science is being misinterpreted and spun. Kelly Jo Smart/NPR hide caption

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Kelly Jo Smart/NPR

From field to bakery, a loaf of bread packs a measurable environmental punch. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

What's The Environmental Footprint Of A Loaf Of Bread? Now We Know

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