The Salt Featured Two The Salt featured two

The Salt Featured Two

Fortified dwelling and open air banquet, detail from a mosaic portraying a Nilotic landscape from El Alia, Tunisia. Roman Civilisation, 2nd century. Musée National Du Bardo (Archaeological Museum) DeAgostini/Getty Images hide caption

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DeAgostini/Getty Images

New Mexico state Sen. Michael Padilla says he has heard of "lunch shaming" practices around the country, including students being given different food if they can't afford the regular hot lunch. Don Bartletti/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Don Bartletti/LA Times via Getty Images

Lawmaker's Childhood Experience Drives New Mexico's 'Lunch Shaming' Ban

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A visitor to the Robert Mondavi Winery in Napa Valley, Calif., attends a wine tasting class. Unlike food — which gives us sensory cues like crunchy and hot, as well as tasting, say, salty — with wine, it's all about tiny differences in taste and smell. The danger is in getting too poetic. Charles O'Rear/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles O'Rear/Getty Images

For people with celiac disease gluten-free food is a must. A new study suggests that a common virus may trigger the onset of the disease. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Bone broth has become so popular these days that the bones used to make it are getting harder — and more expensive — for broth retailers to source. Alex Reynolds/NPR hide caption

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Alex Reynolds/NPR

In 1957, Duncan Hines and his wife, Clara, cut a cake at the Duncan Hines test kitchen in Ithaca, N.Y. Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU hide caption

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Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU

Atole de elote is a warm corn drink from Central America. Student Jose Rivas wrote an essay about a weekly tradition of enjoying atole with his late father in El Salvador, and how the drink helped him to feel more at home after he moved to the U.S. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

Anyone who has read or seen Victor Hugo's masterpiece knows the plot of Les Miserables turns on the theft of a simple loaf of bread. There was no sharper barometer of economic status in 19th-century France than bread. Minnie Phan for NPR hide caption

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Minnie Phan for NPR

As they travel the parade route, tuxedoed men and youths distribute strings of colorful beads, dried fava beans and genuine Italian kisses. Courtesy of The Italian American St. Joseph Society hide caption

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Courtesy of The Italian American St. Joseph Society

In an image from the first Foxfire book, students in 1969 look on as Hobe Beasley, John Hopper and Hopper's wife suspend a hog for finishing the work of scalding and scraping. Courtesy of The Foxfire Fund, Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of The Foxfire Fund, Inc.

Miners favored the pasty due to its portable nature — a small meat pie that could easily be carried into the mines for 12-hour workdays. Matt Cardy/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Cardy/Getty Images

La Belle Limonadiere, hand coloured etching (1816). Lemonade was ubiquitous in mid-17th century Paris. Where the limonadiers went, piles of spent lemon peels followed. As rats nibbled on the peels, they killed off plague-infected fleas, Tom Nealon argues in his new book. Courtesy of The British Library Board/The Overlook Press hide caption

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Courtesy of The British Library Board/The Overlook Press