The Salt Featured Two The Salt featured two

An illustration shows spikes of different types of wheat: (1) Polish wheat (2) Club wheat (3) Common bread wheat (4) Poulard wheat (5) Durum wheat (6) Spelt (7) Emmer (8) Einkorn. The Library of Congress/Flickr The Commons hide caption

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The Library of Congress/Flickr The Commons

The John C. Sullenger Vineyard at Nickel & Nickel Winery, Napa Valley, Calif. Nickel & Nickel collaborated with scientists to collect wine samples and identify the bacteria and fungi in them by sequencing microbial DNA. Jason Tinacci/Courtesy of Nickel & Nickel hide caption

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Jason Tinacci/Courtesy of Nickel & Nickel

Why did humans start cultivating celery? It's low-calorie and, one might argue, low flavor. We asked some experts at the intersection of botany and anthropology to share their best guesses. Cora Niele/Getty Images hide caption

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Cora Niele/Getty Images

The Oculus cake now being sold by the new caterer running the SFMOMA's upstairs cafe. The cake was inspired by the distinctive tower at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. It is similar in design and spirit to a cake prepared by Caitlin Freeman and her baking team for a museum event several years ago. (See below.) Connor Radnovich/ Courtesy of The San Francisco Chronicle hide caption

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Connor Radnovich/ Courtesy of The San Francisco Chronicle

Beyonce inked a $50 million endorsement deal with Pepsi in 2012. Walter McBride/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Walter McBride/Corbis via Getty Images

This Is How Much Celebrities Get Paid To Endorse Soda And Unhealthy Food

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Mimi Sheraton is no fan of kale chips, shown here at Elizabeth's Gone Raw on May 20, 2011 in Washington, D.C. Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

Kill The Culture Of Cool Kale, Food Critic Says

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Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor discuss the court's food traditions. RBG let us in on a secret: The reason she was not entirely awake at the State of the Union? She wasn't totally sober. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Tomatoes from Canada, Mexico and Florida Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Morgan McCloy/NPR

The Search For Tastier Supermarket Tomatoes: A Tale In 3 Acts

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Patricia Gallagher (from left), who first proposed the tasting; wine merchant Steven Spurrier; and influential French wine editor Odette Kahn. After the results were announced, Kahn is said to have demanded her scorecard back. "She wanted to make sure that the world didn't know what her scores were," says George Taber, the only journalist present that day. Courtesy of Bella Spurrier hide caption

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Courtesy of Bella Spurrier

The Judgment Of Paris: The Blind Taste Test That Decanted The Wine World

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Chinese and other Asian beer brands on display at a supermarket. An ancient brewery discovered in China's Central Plain shows the Chinese were making barley beer with fairly advanced techniques some 5,000 years ago. Chris/Flickr hide caption

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Chris/Flickr