The Salt Featured Two The Salt featured two

The Salt Featured Two

Thai and Burmese fishing boat workers sit inside a cell at the compound of a fishing company in Benjina, Indonesia on Nov. 22, 2014. The imprisoned men were considered slaves who might run away. Dita Alangkara/AP hide caption

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Dita Alangkara/AP

"It now pays to get a lot of pleasure out of a little bit of sugar," says Danielle Reed, a scientist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

The Gene For Sweet: Why We Don't All Taste Sugar The Same Way

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Iced tea made from local berries is served with melon and squares of sweet sticky rice topped with fruits and nuts. The nuns eat these sweets on head-shaving day, to replenish their energy. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Buddhist Diet For A Clear Mind: Nuns Preserve Art Of Korean Temple Food

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Lee Perry-Gal measures chicken long bones at the zooarchaeology lab, Zinman Institute of Archaeology, University of Haifa. Courtesy of Guy Bar-Oz hide caption

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Courtesy of Guy Bar-Oz

The Ancient City Where People Decided To Eat Chickens

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Beyond the fruit-sweetened stuff: Around the world, cooks turn to yogurt for a huge variety of culinary delights. From left: cast-iron chicken marinated in a yogurt-spice blend and topped with the Middle Eastern grain freekeh; a Persian cold yogurt soup; shitake frittata with labneh, kale and shallots. From Yogurt Culture by Cheryl Sternman Rule Ellen Silverman/Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hide caption

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Ellen Silverman/Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Scientists have documented that beneficial microorganisms play a critical role in how our bodies function. And it's becoming clear that the influence goes beyond the gut — researchers are turning their attention to our emotional health. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Prozac In The Yogurt Aisle: Can 'Good' Bacteria Chill Us Out?

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Waiter carriers pass food to passengers on a train stopping in Gordonsville, Va., in this undated photo. After the Civil War, local African-American women found a route to financial freedom by selling their famous fried chicken and other home-made goods track-side. Courtesy of the Town of Gordonsville hide caption

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Courtesy of the Town of Gordonsville

What to Eat When You're Pregnant by Dr. Nicole Avena guides women through the stages of pregnancy with suggestions for nutritious foods that support the baby's development. Courtesy of Ten Speed Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Ten Speed Press

Afternoon Tea, 1886. Chromolithograph after Kate Greenaway. If you're looking for finger sandwiches, dainty desserts and formality, afternoon tea is your cup. Print Collector/Getty Images hide caption

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Print Collector/Getty Images

To make baby back ribs in an hour, instead of the usual three to four hours, you'll need a pressure cooker. Photo Illustration by Ryan Kellman and Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Ryan Kellman and Emily Bogle/NPR

Do Try This At Home: Hacking Ribs — In The Pressure Cooker

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