The Salt Featured Two The Salt featured two
Special Series

The Salt Featured Two

Jollof rice is the celebration dish of West Africa. At its basic, it includes rice, tomatoes, onions and chili peppers. But there are a zillion variations, depending on your country of origin, and the friendly rivalry can get intense over which version reigns supreme. Matthew Mead/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matthew Mead/AP

Jollof Rice: West Africans Dish It Up With A Hefty Serving Of Smack Talk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/491380208/492005224" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Thomas Edison (from left), Luther Burbank and Henry Ford. Two are still world-famous; the guy in the middle brought us many crop experiments, including the Himalayan blackberry that's now inescapable in Seattle. New York Botanical Garden/LuEsther T. Mertz Library/Biodiversity Heritage Library hide caption

toggle caption
New York Botanical Garden/LuEsther T. Mertz Library/Biodiversity Heritage Library

Ramen will buy anything from smuggled fruit to laundry services from fellow inmates, a study at one prison finds. It's not just that ramen is tasty: Prisoners say they're not getting enough food. DigiPub/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
DigiPub/Getty Images

Quiosque de Refresco do Largo da Sé, in Alfama, Lisbon. More than a century and a half ago, these ornate little kiosks began cropping up in the city's parks and plazas, becoming the heart of public life. But they fell into disrepair and all but disappeared, until an architect and an entrepreneur joined forces to restore them to their former glory and place of prominence. Paul Arps/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Arps/Flickr

History, Horchata And Hope: How Classic Kiosks Are Boosting Lisbon's Public Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485228299/488191817" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As the wild oyster population resurges, there is an added bonus — our waterways are getting cleaner. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

The Oyster's Mighty Comeback Is Creating Cleaner U.S. Waterways

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488122810/488122811" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Salvage Supperclub hosts dinners in clean, tastefully decked out dumpsters. The menus highlight ingredients frequently tossed out by home cooks – think wilted basil or bruised plums — that could be put to tastier uses. Courtesy of Andrew Hinderaker hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Andrew Hinderaker

Helen Gurley Brown in her office at Cosmopolitan magazine in the 1960s .The legendary editor, subject of two new biographies, knew sex sells – and food brings in ad money. She cannily combined them with features like "After Bed, What? (a light snack for an encore)." Santi Visalli/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Santi Visalli/Getty Images

"Nobody can soldier without coffee," a Union soldier wrote in 1865. (Above) Union soldiers sit with their coffee in tin cups, their hard-tack, and a kettle at their feet. Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection/Flickr The Commons hide caption

toggle caption
Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection/Flickr The Commons

If War Is Hell, Then Coffee Has Offered U.S. Soldiers Some Salvation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485227943/487303122" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A first-timer's attempt at making part of a 'character bento,' or Kyaraben, lunch. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elise Hu/NPR

For Japanese Parents, Gorgeous Bento Lunches Are Packed With High Stakes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486941516/487237272" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Yao honey hunter Orlando Yassene holds a male greater honeyguide temporarily captured for research in the Niassa National Reserve, Mozambique. The birds will flutter in front of people, tweet and fly from tree to tree to guide hunters to bees' nests that are hidden inside the trunks of hollow trees. This teamwork could date back thousands or even a million years. Claire Spottiswoode hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Spottiswoode

How Wild Birds Team Up With Humans To Guide Them To Honey

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486471339/486933704" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Grains, beads and bangles unearthed from dig sites in Banda, Ghana, tell of a time when droughts did not bring famine. (Above) Archaeologists Amanda Logan and Osei Kofi dig into the floor of a house from the 1500s. Courtesy of Ann Stahl/Northwestern University hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Ann Stahl/Northwestern University

Starting this week, Wal-Mart, America's largest grocer, says it will start piloting sales of weather-dented apples at a discount in 300 of its Florida stores. Courtesy of Wal-Mart hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Wal-Mart

Lebanese chefs celebrate in Beirut after setting a new Guinness record for what was then the biggest tub of hummus in the world — weighing over 2 tons — in October 2009. The world record effort was part of Lebanon's bid to claim hummus as its own. Ramzi Haidar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ramzi Haidar/AFP/Getty Images

Give Chickpeas A Chance: Why Hummus Unites, And Divides, The Mideast

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/483715410/486432965" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workers sort potatoes in the field, collecting small and large ones in different buckets. Each bucket weighs 30 pounds or so. A worker will shoulder that bucket and dump it into a flatbed truck hundreds of times each day. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Charles/NPR