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The Salt Featured Two

Focusing less on the meat-free or health aspects of plant-based dishes, like this jackfruit burger — and more on their flavor, mouthfeel and provenance — could go a long way toward getting meat lovers to choose these options more often. That's according to research by the World Resources Institute's Better Buying Lab in conjunction with food chains, marketers and behavioral economists. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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How To Get Meat Eaters To Eat More Plant-Based Foods? Make Their Mouths Water

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To help protect the planet and promote good health, people should eat less than 1 ounce of red meat a day and limit poultry and milk, too. That's according to a new report from some of the top names in nutrition science. People should instead consume more nuts, fruits and vegetables, legumes, and whole grains, the report says. The strict recommended limits on meat are getting pushback. Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61

Slow carbs like whole-grain breads and pastas, oats and brown rice are rich in fiber and take more time to digest, so they don't lead to the same quick rise in blood sugar that refined carbs can cause. fcafotodigital/Getty Images hide caption

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You Don't Have To Go No-Carb: Instead, Think Slow Carb

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The key to making the quintessential biscuit of the American South, like these from Callie's Charleston Biscuits Bakery in Charleston, S.C., is more about technique than a specific flour, some bakers say. Brett Flashnick/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Brett Flashnick/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Sriraja Panich is the brand name of one of two Sriracha sauces created by Saowanit Trikityanukul's family. The family sold the brand to Thaitheparos, Thailand's leading sauce company, in the 1980s. The brand has struggled to gain a foothold in the U.S., where the Huy Fong Rooster brand of Sriracha, created by Vietnamese-American David Tran, reigns supreme. Michael Sullivan/for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan/for NPR

In Home Of Original Sriracha Sauce, Thais Say Rooster Brand Is Nothing To Crow About

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Mama Stamberg's cranberry relish recipe. Ariel Zambelich & Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich & Emily Bogle/NPR

Cranberry Relish: The NPR Recipe That Divides Thanksgiving Tables

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People who are sensitive to the bitterness of caffeine tend to drink more coffee than others, while people sensitive to bitter flavors like quinine drink less coffee, according to a new study. Dimitri Otis/Getty Images hide caption

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Dimitri Otis/Getty Images

Microplastics are not just showing up on beaches like this one in the Canary Islands — a very small study shows that they are in human waste in many parts of the world. Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images

The barley used to make beer as we know it may take a hit under climate change, but growers say they are already preparing by planting it farther north in colder locations. Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images

San Diego high school students await a bus ride to Blythe, Calif., to go pick cantaloupes in the summer of 1965. They were recruited as part of the A-TEAM, a government program to replace migrant farm workers with high school students. Courtesy of the San Diego Union-Tribune hide caption

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Courtesy of the San Diego Union-Tribune

The vines at Pheasant Ridge Winery near Lubbock, Texas, were devastated by drift from the herbicide 2,4-D in 2016. Merrit Kennedy/NPR hide caption

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Merrit Kennedy/NPR

West Texas Vineyards Blasted By Herbicide Drift From Nearby Cotton Fields

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Microplastics found along Lake Ontario by Rochman's team Chris Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Chris Joyce/NPR

Beer, Drinking Water And Fish: Tiny Plastic Is Everywhere

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The latest study to link coffee and longevity adds to a growing body of evidence that, far from a vice, the brew can be protective of good health. Sutthiwat Srikhrueadam / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Sutthiwat Srikhrueadam / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Coffee Drinkers Are More Likely To Live Longer. Decaf May Do The Trick, Too

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