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The habit of ordering unneeded tests and treatments drives up medical costs. It's a pattern doctors often learn in medical school and residency. Medioimages/Photodisc/Getty Images hide caption

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Pandemic Panic? These 5 Tips Can Help You Regain Your Calm

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The first U.S. case of COVID-19 was treated at Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett, Washington. Robin Addison, a nurse there, demonstrates how she wears a respirator helmet with a face shield intended to prevent infection. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

"It's not going to be transported on a box," Dr. Michael Ison, an infectious disease specialist at Northwestern University, says of your chances of contracting the novel coronavirus from packages shipped from China. Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images

No, You Won't Catch The New Coronavirus Via Packages Or Mail From China

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A Chicago woman in her 60s is the second U.S. citizen to become infected with the dangerous new coronavirus, health officials said. Tami Chappell/Reuters hide caption

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Tami Chappell/Reuters

2nd U.S. Case Of Wuhan Coronavirus Confirmed

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Declines in smoking contributed to a drop in lung cancer death rates that helped drive down overall cancer death rates in the U.S., according to the latest analysis of trends by the American Cancer Society. VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images

Progress On Lung Cancer Drives Historic Drop In U.S. Cancer Death Rate

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Martin Shkreli, former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, appeared before the House Oversight Committee during a contentious hearing on drug pricing on Feb. 4, 2016. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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The spending bill to fund the government for the next fiscal year is expected to pass by Friday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Some Big Health Care Policy Changes Are Hiding In The Federal Spending Package

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RK workers depart a bus on their way to the job site at a new airport under construction in Salt Lake City. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

A Construction Company Embraces Frank Talk About Mental Health To Reduce Suicide

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Attendees hold "We Vape, We Vote" signs ahead of a Trump rally last month in Dallas. The politics surrounding vaping and industry pushback against regulation appear to have derailed the Trump administration's plan to ban the sales of many vaping products. Dylan Hollingsworth/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dylan Hollingsworth/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Paramedics in Portland, Maine, respond to a call for a heroin overdose. A new report estimates some $60 billion was spent on health care related to opioid addiction in 2018. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

The Real Cost Of The Opioid Epidemic: An Estimated $179 Billion In Just 1 Year

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Sometimes doctors rapidly taper their chronic pain patients' opioid doses. Now a federal agency recommends against this. Douglas Sacha/Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas Sacha/Getty Images

Don't Force Patients Off Opioids Abruptly, New Guidelines Say, Warning Of Severe Risks

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Tracy Lee for NPR

How To Teach Future Doctors About Pain In The Midst Of The Opioid Crisis

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U.S. health officials are again urging people to stop vaping until experts figure out why some are coming down with serious respiratory illnesses. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

People light candles during a prayer and candle vigil organized by the city, after the recent shooting at a WalMart in El Paso, Texas. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

From Pain To Purpose: 5 Ways To Cope In The Wake Of Trauma

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Robyn Adcock (left), a University of California, San Francisco pain relief specialist, gently guides Jessica Greenfield to acupressure points on her son's foot and leg that have helped relieve his chronic pain. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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Alison Kodjak/NPR

Pain Rescue Team Helps Seriously Ill Kids Cope In Terrible Times

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Researchers Explore Why Women's Alzheimer's Risk Is Higher Than Men's

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Kim Ryu for NPR

Rural Health: Financial Insecurity Plagues Many Who Live With Disability

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Chris Nickels for NPR

How The Brain Shapes Pain And Links Ouch With Emotion

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A new book, Bottle of Lies, reveals serious safety and purity concerns about the global generic-drug supply. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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The Generic Drugs You're Taking May Not Be As Safe Or Effective As You Think

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