Teenage Diaries Revisited Beginning in 1996, Radio Diaries gave tape recorders to teens to create audio diaries about their lives. NPR aired intimate portraits of five of these teens. Over the past year, this same group has been recording new stories about where life has led them for our series, Teenage Diaries Revisited.

Melissa Rodriguez struggled to create a stable life at home for her son in the late 1990s. Today, he's a teenager and together, they've faced many challenges. Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Teenage Diaries Revisited: Mother And Son Listen To The Past

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In 1996, Josh Cutler took his tape recorder to high school, documenting his effort to live a normal life. Today, he also documents his efforts to live a normal life with a brain that often betrays him. Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Teenage Diaries Revisited: Growing Up With Tourette's

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Frankie Lewchuk had been a high school football star whose picture was in his hometown newspaper every week. Now, after struggling with a crystal meth addiction, he is trying to repair his life. Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Teenage Diaries Revisited: From Kicking A Football To Kicking Meth

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Joe Richman, founder and executive producer of Radio Diaries, tracked down some of the teen diarists from the 1990s and got updates on their lives. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Juan recorded his first diary at 18. He now lives in Colorado and is married with three children. Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Teenage Diaries Revisited: Living Life Under The Radar

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Amanda as a teenager (left). She now lives in Manhattan and works as a massage therapist. Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Teenage Diaries Revisited: A Gay Teen's Family, 'Evolved'

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