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NPR.org's Most Popular Stories

In the last 24 hours, updated hourly

President Joe Biden and his wife, Jill Biden, shown here on Jan. 20, 2021, attend Mass at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle during Inauguration Day ceremonies in Washington, D.C. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

President Joe Biden takes questions from reporters as he speaks about the American Rescue Plan, in the State Dining Room of the White House, Wednesday, May 5, in Washington. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Why Some States Push Back As The Biden Administration Doles Out Relief Money

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Missouri Gov. Mike Parson speaks at a campaign rally at a gun store in October in Lee's Summit, Mo. Parson has signed into law a measure that could fine state and local law enforcement officers $50,000 for helping to enforce federal gun laws. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

A teen gets a dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine last month at Holtz Children's Hospital in Miami. Nearly 7 million U.S. teens and preteens (ages 12 through 17) have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine so far, the CDC says. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie in Paris in Jan. 2020. Christophe Archambault/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Christophe Archambault/AFP via Getty Images

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Directs Fiery Essay At Former Student — And Cancel Culture

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Washington State Department of Agriculture entomologist Chris Looney displays a dead Asian giant hornet, a sample sent from Japan and brought in for research last year in Blaine, Wash. Elaine Thompson /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Elaine Thompson /AFP via Getty Images

Patricia McCloskey and her husband Mark McCloskey pleaded guilty to misdemeanor crimes on Thursday. They also agreed to forfeit both weapons they used when they confronted protesters in front of their home in June of last year. Jim Salter/AP hide caption

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Jim Salter/AP

It was Brett Kavanaugh's conservative cred that led Trump to nominate the jurist for the Supreme Court, which resulted in one of the most dramatic hearings in recent Senate history. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

When relaying why she chose the farm fields for her college graduation photo shoot, Jennifer Rocha explained it's because that's where her parents "sacrificed their backs, their sweat, their early mornings, late afternoons, working cold winters, hot summers just to give me and my sisters an education." Branden Rodriguez/Instagram @branden.shoots hide caption

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Branden Rodriguez/Instagram @branden.shoots
Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

You're Apologizing All Wrong. Here's How To Say Sorry The Right Way

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Opal Lee, shown earlier this month, is celebrating this week's passage of legislation making Juneteenth a federal holiday. President Biden signed the bill Thursday. Amanda McCoy/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Amanda McCoy/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

During the War on Drugs, the Brownsville neighborhood in New York City saw some of the highest rates of incarceration in the U.S., as Black and Hispanic men were sent to prison for lengthy prison sentences, often for low-level, nonviolent drug crimes. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

After 50 Years Of The War On Drugs, 'What Good Is It Doing For Us?'

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With six conservative justices, the U.S. Supreme Court sided with a Catholic group in its dispute with the city of Philadelphia over LGBTQ couples and foster care. Erin Schaff/AP hide caption

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Erin Schaff/AP

Supreme Court Rules Catholic Group Doesn't Have To Consider LGBTQ Foster Parents

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Baker Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop, manages his shop in Lakewood, Colo. Phillips, the Colorado baker who won a partial victory at the U.S. Supreme Court in 2018 for refusing to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple, violated the state's anti-discrimination law by refusing to make a birthday cake for a transgender woman. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

WISA Woodsat, seen in an artist's rendering, is billed as the world's first wooden satellite. It's set to be launched from New Zealand before the end of the year. Arctic Astronautics/ESA hide caption

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Arctic Astronautics/ESA