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Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke speaks on the Trump administration's energy policy at the Heritage Foundation in Washington in September 2017. Nine of 12 members of the National Park Service advisory board resigned Monday citing Zinke's unwillingness to meet with the panel. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A man gets ready to let one loose. Not pictured: all the folks around him diving for cover. CSA-Printstock/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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CSA-Printstock/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Colin Campbell, shown last month in his home near Los Angeles, was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease — ALS — eight years ago. He gets Medicare because of his disability, but was incorrectly told by several agencies that he couldn't use it for home care. Instead, he pays $4,000 a month for those services. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

An engineer shows a sample of biodiesel at an industrial complex in General Lagos, Santa Fe province, Argentina. The United States recently imposed duties on Argentine biodiesel, blocking it from the U.S. market. Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images

A car dashcam captures a view of a meteor near Bloomfield Hills, Mich., on Tuesday in this still image from video obtained from social media. Youtube Mike Austin/via Reuters hide caption

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Youtube Mike Austin/via Reuters

Riverside County Sheriff's Department Capt. Greg Fellows speaks with reporters during a news conference in Perris, Calif. on Tuesday. A 17-year-old girl called police after escaping from her family's home where she and her brothers and sisters were locked up in filthy conditions, some so malnourished officers at first believed all were children even though seven are adults. Amy Taxin/AP hide caption

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Amy Taxin/AP

Larry Nassar listens to victim impact statements prior to being sentenced after being accused of molesting more than 140 women and girls while he was a physician for Team USA and Michigan State University. Nassar has pleaded guilty in Ingham County, Mich., to sexually assaulting seven girls, but the judge is allowing all of his accusers to speak. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Ezzard Turner, a dean at the City on a Hill Circuit Street charter school in Boston, returns students' phones after locking them in pouches for the school day. A new policy at the school aims to literally contain distractions by requiring the phones to stay locked up until dismissal time. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

A School's Way To Fight Phones In Class: Lock 'Em Up

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With North Korea planning to participate in the 2018 Winter Olympics, delegation head Jon Jong Su, vice chairman of the Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of the Country, crosses the concrete border to attend a meeting at the truce village of Panmunjom in the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas. Yonhap via Reuters hide caption

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Yonhap via Reuters

North Korean Athletes Will March With South Koreans At Pyeongchang Olympics

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The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a case where a defense lawyer refused to follow the instructions of his client, who contended he was innocent. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Liam James Doyle/NPR

Do You Have The Right To Plead Not Guilty When Your Lawyer Disagrees?

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The New York Times says the investigation took place against a backdrop of a major breach of CIA informants in China that began around 2010. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

"Racial impostor syndrome" is definitely a thing for many people. We hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

'Racial Impostor Syndrome': Here Are Your Stories

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Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen looks on during a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill Tuesday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Homeland Security Secretary Says She 'Did Not Hear' Trump Use 'That' Vulgar Word

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An NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds special counsel Robert Mueller is largely unknown to the public, which puts him in a precarious position. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Demonstrators protest at Sen. Dean Heller's, R-Nev., office in support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), and Temporary Protected Status (TPS), programs on Capitol Hill on Tuesday. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP