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Democrats accuse President Trump of intervening in the decisions involving the fate of the FBI's headquarters in Washington to help protect his hotel up the street. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Trump Intervened In FBI HQ Project To Protect His Hotel, Democrats Allege

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Seth Frotman, former student loan ombudsman at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, poses at NPR headquarters in September. Frotman and his team reviewed thousands of complaints about the questionable practices of student loan companies. Cameron Pollack/NPR hide caption

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Why Public Service Loan Forgiveness Is So Unforgiving

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University of Oregon scientists used real dust from inside homes around Portland to test the effects of sunlight, UV light and darkness on bacteria found in the dust. Dave G Kelly/Getty Images hide caption

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A sign outside Ajo, Ariz., warns hikers to keep an eye out for people who have unlawfully crossed the nearby border with Mexico. No More Deaths and other humanitarian groups use a private residence they call "the barn" on the outskirts of the small town as a base of operations. Ryan Lucas/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Lucas/NPR

Deep In The Desert, A Case Pits Immigration Crackdown Against Religious Freedom

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Women gather for a rally and march at Grant Park on Saturday in Chicago to urge voter turnout ahead of the midterm elections. Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The authors of a new study on veterinarians and mental health say vet school should include more training on how to cope with the moral distress vets face when asked by pet owners to do things that are against their medical judgment. Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images

Texas Democratic Senate candidate Beto O'Rourke, seen campaigning in Houston this month, has launched his first attack ads on Republican Sen. Ted Cruz as he tries to regain traction in the last weeks of the campaign. Loren Elliott/Getty Images hide caption

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Beto O'Rourke Goes On The Attack Against Ted Cruz

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The barley used to make beer as we know it may take a hit under climate change, but growers say they are already preparing by planting it farther north in colder locations. Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Brian Bartlett from the South Florida Search and Rescue team checks in on Tom Garcia, who stayed in his home through Hurricane Michael. Experts say people's decisions to stay are almost always carefully considered. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks during the Cinema Cafe at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival on Jan. 21 in Park City, Utah. Robin Marchant/Getty Images hide caption

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As head of the police in Kandahar, Lt. Gen. Abdul Raziq was credited with bringing more security to the southern Afghan city. Raziq died in an attack Thursday; he's seen here in a photo from 2015. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

A new analysis of what were initially thought to be microbial fossils in Greenland suggests they might instead just be mineral structures created when ancient tectonic forces squeezed stone. While most of the structures point in one direction, the red arrow shows that some point in the other direction. Courtesy of Abigail Allwood hide caption

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Courtesy of Abigail Allwood

Geologists Question 'Evidence Of Ancient Life' In 3.7 Billion-Year-Old Rocks

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A British advertising watchdog group ruled on Wednesday that the Spotify horror ad is "likely to cause undue distress to children." Chester Bennington/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Chester Bennington/Screenshot by NPR

Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is shown during a visit to Spain in April. At 33, Mohammed is the kingdom's de facto ruler, and he faces increasing criticism for his handling of issues ranging from the Saudi role in Yemen's war to the recent disappearance of a Saudi journalist in Turkey. Paul White/AP hide caption

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Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg speaks during a joint statement with German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Tuesday. The following day, Solberg apologized to the "German girls" who faced government retaliation for their relationships with occupying German forces during World War II. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

The Washington Post has published the last column prominent Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi wrote before he disappeared earlier this month. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamal Khashoggi's Last Column Before Disappearance Calls For Free Expression

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White House senior adviser Jared Kushner and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman have reportedly forged close ties focused on the Middle East peace process. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post; Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post; Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images