NPR.org's Most Popular Stories The most viewed stories on NPR.org in the last 24 hours, updated hourly.

NPR.org's Most Popular Stories

In the last 24 hours, updated hourly

"Now you can finally be free from liberal paper straws that fall apart within minutes and ruin your drink," declares President Trump's campaign manager. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Greg Force and Abby Force at StoryCorps in Greenville, S.C. Alletta Cooper/StoryCorps hide caption

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Alletta Cooper/StoryCorps

How A 10-Year-Old-Boy Helped Apollo 11 Return To Earth

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From left, Hugh Hurwitz, acting director of the Bureau of Prisons; Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen; and David Muhlhausen, director of the National Institute of Justice, appear at a press conference at the Department of Justice on Friday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Thousands Freed From Prison Custody As DOJ Implements Sentencing Reform Law

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Opponents running to Joe Biden's left say his health plan for America merely "tinkers around the edges" of the Affordable Care Act. But a close read reveals some initiatives in Biden's plan that are so expansive they might have trouble passing even a Congress held by Democrats. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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The New York Times first reported last week that eight former Dalton students said the way Jeffrey Epstein interacted with teenage girls had stuck with them since high school. Last week, Epstein was charged with sex trafficking of minors. Patrick McMullan/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick McMullan/Getty Images

Students chip and chisel away at heavy slabs of stone in the workshops of the Hector Guimard high school, less than three miles from Paris' Notre Dame cathedral. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

Notre Dame Fire Revives Demand For Skilled Stone Carvers In France

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The Kyoto Animation Studio in Kyoto, Japan, was set ablaze on Thursday morning, killing 33 and injuring more than 30 others before the fire was put out on Friday morning. The suspect believed to be behind the arson has is being treated for burns. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., joined from left by House Republican Conference chair Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., speaks to reporters prior to a vote called by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., to condemn what she called "racist comments" by President Donald Trump, at the Capitol on July 16, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Opinion: Should Republicans Still Call Themselves The Party Of Lincoln?

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The viral face-transforming FaceApp climbed to the top of the App Store on Wednesday. FaceApp hide caption

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FaceApp

Democrats Issue Warnings Against Viral Russia-Based Face-Morphing App

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Pengyin Chen, professor of soybean breeding and genetics at the University of Missouri, in his test plots of soybeans near the town of Portageville. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Rogue Weedkiller Vapors Are Threatening Soybean Science

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Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Beyond 'Good' Vs. 'Bad' Touch: 4 Lessons To Help Prevent Child Sexual Abuse

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A federally funded study is testing aerobic exercise as a way to prevent the development of Alzheimer's disease. Stewart Cohen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stewart Cohen/Getty Images

Is Aerobic Exercise The Right Prescription For Staving Off Alzheimer's?

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In the summer of 1927, Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston drove together from Alabama to New York. Just outside Savannah, Ga., they gave a ride to a young person running away from a chain gang. An essay Hughes wrote about that encounter has recently resurfaced: Read it here. Jack Delano/Library of Congress hide caption

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Jack Delano/Library of Congress

In Lost Essay, Langston Hughes Recounts Meeting A Young Chain Gang Runaway

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President Trump continued his attacks on members of Congress during a campaign rally in Greenville, N.C., Wednesday night. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images