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In the last 24 hours, updated hourly

Anti-abortion activists rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 6. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, ending right to abortion upheld for decades

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People line up outside of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on June 23, as the city makes vaccines available to residents possibly exposed to monkeypox. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Monkeypox outbreak in U.S. is bigger than the CDC reports. Testing is 'abysmal'

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A group photo of the justices at the Supreme Court in Washington on April 23, 2021. Seated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor. Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett. Erin Schaff/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Schaff/AFP via Getty Images

Marine Corps Lt. Col. Oliver North, accompanied by his lawyer Brendan Sullivan, was a central figure in the Iran-Contra hearings. Chris Wilkins/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Dobbs is the state health officer at the Mississippi State Department of Health. His name appears on the landmark Supreme Court case on abortion rights, despite having "nothing to do with it," he has said. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

People with disabilities worry about how they will be disproportionately affected by the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Team USA coach Andrea Fuentes brings Anita Alvarez from the bottom of the pool at the 2022 World Aquatics Championships in Budapest. Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images
Tracy Lee for NPR

For doctors, abortion restrictions create an 'impossible choice' when providing care

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These conservative Supreme Court justices overturned Roe v. Wade. From a group photo of the justices at the Supreme Court. Erin Schaff/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Schaff/AFP via Getty Images

A syringe is prepared with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic in Chester, Pa., on Dec. 15, 2021. Pfizer says tweaking its COVID-19 vaccine to better target the omicron variant is safe and boosts protection. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

A slew of companies will cover travel expenses for employees that have to travel out of their state for an abortion after the Supreme Court overturned federal protections for the procedure. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

An attendee holds her child during A Texas Rally for Abortion Rights at Discovery Green in Houston, Texas, on May 7. Recently passed laws make abortion illegal after about six weeks into a pregnancy. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Riot police officers cordon off the area after migrants arrive on Spanish soil and crossing the fences separating the Spanish enclave of Melilla from Morocco in Melilla, Spain, Friday, June 24, 2022. Javier Bernardo/AP hide caption

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Javier Bernardo/AP

A woman exhales while vaping from a Juul pen e-cigarette in 2019. A federal court has temporarily put on hold an FDA ban against the company's vaping products. Craig Mitchelldyer/AP hide caption

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Craig Mitchelldyer/AP

Fanny Sung (left) and her younger sister, Marianne Sung (right). Abortion — and whether to get one — changed the two sisters' lives in ways that affected them for years to come. Paige Pfleger/WPLN News hide caption

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Paige Pfleger/WPLN News

Two sisters got pregnant young. Their choices and their secrets shaped their lives

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